Ptolemaic


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Related to Ptolemaic: Ptolemaic dynasty, Ptolemaic theory

Ptolemaic

1. of or relating to the 2nd century ad. Greek astronomer, mathematician and geographer Ptolemy (Latin name Claudius Ptolemaeus) or to his conception of the universe
2. of or relating to the Macedonian dynasty that ruled Egypt from the death of Alexander the Great (323 bc) to the death of Cleopatra (30 bc)
References in periodicals archive ?
This book provides the reader with a very useful introduction to the Red Sea trade in Ptolemaic and Roman times, on both a regional and an interregional scale.
My exegetical research on Kohelet supports the dating of the book to the Ptolemaic period.
Nea Paphos ("Paphos" in common parlance in the first century), founded on the southwest coast at the end of the fourth century BC, became the Ptolemaic capital because of its naval advantages.
Imposing: Unfinished basalt statue of a Ptolemaic pharaoh 305-30BC.
The researcher compared the group statue with another Ptolemaic sculpture, the statue of Pakhom, governor of Dendera, now on display at the Detroit Institute of Arts, USA.
18) The youngest child, Ptolemy Philadelphos, was given the names of Ptolemy I Soter's son and heir, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, under whom the Ptolemaic Empire had reached its peak.
It also has monuments that can be dated to the Graeco-Roman and Ptolemaic eras.
A cachette of 600 Ptolemaic statues were also unearthed during the routine excavations, including a large collection of icons depicting Bastet, goddess of protection and motherhood, along with bronze and ceramic statues of Egyptian deities such as Harpocrates and Ptah.
The problem with this attribution to Copernicanism is that Copernicus himself insists in his Preface to De Revolutionibus (dedicated 'To Pope Paul III, Most Holy Lord') that it was precisely the proliferation of inconsistencies resulting from the so-called 'self-evidence' of the Ptolemaic system that required an approach 'contrary to the impression of the senses'.
explaining how its appearance on, inter alia, the Dieppe maps of the 1530s-60s, is not evidence of Portuguese discovery of Australia, but rather an artifact of the sixteenth-century's struggle to bridge the gap from the former Ptolemaic world-view paradigm to a new paradigm that could take into account the new discoveries of the Age of Exploration while allowing for the inexactitude of contemporary measurement of longitude.
By that time Muslim scientists had already dealt with a majority of the contradictions of Ptolemaic astronomy and many of their findings were available in Latin to the European scientists of the thirteenth to fifteenth century, but what exactly was known to them and how remains unclear.