Ptolemy VIII

Ptolemy VIII

(Ptolemy Physcon) (tŏl`əmē fĭs`kən), d. 116 B.C., king of ancient Egypt (145–116 B.C.), of the Macedonian dynasty, brother of Ptolemy VIPtolemy VI
(Ptolemy Philometor) , d. 145 B.C., king of ancient Egypt (180–145 B.C.), of the Macedonian dynasty, son of Ptolemy V. He became king when an infant, and his mother, Cleopatra, was regent.
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. He is also called Ptolemy Euergetes II. He was coruler with his brother and his brother's wife from 170–164 B.C. Trouble resulted in a settlement by which Ptolemy Physcon ruled Cyrene. On his brother's death he returned to Egypt, had his nephew put to death, and married Cleopatra, his brother's widow. He soon repudiated her and married her daughter, also named Cleopatra. The elder Cleopatra led a revolt and drove him (130 B.C.) out of Egypt. He returned in 127 B.C. and later ruled peacefully though despotically. Both queens survived him. His reign was one of great cruelty; he drove the scholars from Alexandria and thus precipitated the spread of Alexandrian culture.
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This volume jumps to the turbulent times of Ptolemy VI Philometor and his brother Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (ca.
In the following article, Criscuolo adopts an unorthodox interpretation of the wills of Ptolemy VIII, arguing that Rome fabricated them to justify its annexation of Cyrene in 74 B.
He is in accord with Horster, who disputes the tradition that Ptolemy VIII persecuted the Alexandrian scholars.
He denounced the Romans for their pursuit of a Roman advantage (to sympheron) instead of justice (to dikaion), examples of which regard the king Eumenes II, the Achaean politician Callicrates and his opponents, Demetrius I, Ptolemy VI and his brother and rival Ptolemy VIII.
The southern hill has a long history of occupation, serving also as the site of an Early Dynastic chapel, a fort of Menkheperre, and a temple of Ptolemy VIII.
The first Macedonian is the Pharaoh who contributed the most to the building of the Edfu temple, Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II.
The Ptolemaic temple was built at the front of the Middle Kingdom temple, effectively as a pronaos for the earlier building, in the reign of Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II/Cleopatra II.
Compare the almost moulded-looking scenes in the "Hall of Goddesses" (Tod III, 272) with the assured warm and rounded raised relief of Ptolemy VIII in the Hall of Offerings (Tod III, 287) and the more traditional style of the sunken relief on the Roman exterior (Tod III, 70).