Pulcheria


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Pulcheria

(pəlkēr`ēə), 399–453, Roman empress of the East (414–53), daughter of Arcadius and Eudoxia. She became coruler with her brother, Theodosius IITheodosius II,
401–50, Roman emperor of the East (408–50), son and successor of Arcadius. He preferred the study of theology and astronomy to public affairs, which he left to the guidance of his sister, Pulcheria—and, at times, to that of his wife Eudocia.
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, and regent in 414. Theodosius remained under her influence most of his life. Pulcheria took a vow of chastity and brought an almost monastic atmosphere to the Byzantine court. At her brother's death (450) she chose MarcianMarcian
, 396–457, Roman emperor of the East (450–57); successor of Theodosius II, whose sister Pulcheria he married in 450. Orthodox in religious affairs, he convoked (451) the Council of Chalcedon (see Chalcedon, Council of).
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 as emperor and nominally married him.
References in periodicals archive ?
414, when Roman Emperor Theodosius II, age 13, yielded power to his older sister Aelia Pulcheria, who proclaimed herself Empress Augusta of the Eastern Roman Empire.
In early Christian historiography, Theodosius II, brought up to the strictest Christian discipline by his saintly, sedulous sister, the regent Pulcheria, is used to evidence how prosperity comes to those God favors for their religiosity; and so Massinger's main source, a translation of Caussin's Holy Court, builds from this view an extended argument that ascetic perfection, even in the highest heights of worldly power, is no "impossibility" (77) But did this radically sheltered education, administered by women, have an adverse effect on the emperor's confidence and decisiveness as a warrior and governor?
Goldsworthy also fails to discuss the role of leading imperial women, such as Theodosius II's sister Pulcheria, in the court politics connected with ongoing religious controversies, and mentions the council at Chalcedon mostly in passing.
In 428, the newly appointed Nestorius, patriarch of Constantinople, refused to administer the sacraments when he found the virgin Pulcheria seated among the clergy around the altar.
In this section, too, Pentcheva emphasizes the post-iconoclastic development of much of what icon-related stories and legends have dated to an earlier period, such as the account that Empress Eudokia sent the original Hodegetria icon to her sister-in-law, Pulcheria, from Jerusalem in the fifth century.
Scholars currently assume one of two perspectives, the first focusing on the influential role of Empress Pulcheria (d.
138) Pulcheria obliges: "Pray you rise, / And as you rise receive this comfort from mee" (lines 151-52).
He subsequently delivered funeral orations on Princess Pulcheria and Empress Flacilla (385-386) before embarking on a decade of ecclesiastical 'trouble-shooting' (e.
A second interlocutor comments, "I have never disliked Jews as some people do; I am not like Pulcheria who sees a Jew in every bush.
Readers will learn what close analysis of coins can tell us about the role of the fifth-century empress Pulcheria, for example, or the imperial symbolism of the famed Theodora mosaic in Ravenna.
Pulcheria, the only child of the emperor Theodosius, died in 385 at the age of six.