Pullman Strike of 1894

Pullman Strike of 1894

 

a major strike in the USA involving railroad workers. It began on May 11 at plants of the Pullman Palace Car Company in a suburb of Chicago. The workers demanded the restoration of their original wages, which had been cut sharply by 25 to 40 percent at the beginning of the year. The American Railway Union, led by E. Debs, called the strike. By the end of June, a sympathy strike involving more than 150,000 workers had swept the country. President Cleveland sent troops in to suppress the strike, and martial law was imposed in a number of states. However, it was only in July 1894, after mass arrests and the institution of court proceedings against the strike leadership, that the strike was suppressed. The position taken by S. Gompers and other leaders of the American Federation of Labor, who refused to support the striking workers, contributed to the defeat of the Pullman strike.

REFERENCE

Zubok, L. I. Ocherki istorii rabochego dvizheniia v SShA, 1865–1918. Moscow, 1962. Chapter 5.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Pullman Strike of 1894 turned deadly when thousands of U.
Given that, as Jentz and Schneirov acknowledge, this "hegemony" broke down dramatically in the eight-hour day strikes of 1886, then again during the Pullman strike of 1894, the usefulness of hegemony as an organizing principle is questionable at best; clearly, large groups of Chicago's workers continued to question the new capitalist order after the period explored by the book, and did not consent to it in any meaningful way.
Circumstances could be frightening, as when Blessed Sacrament Sisters far from their Pennsylvania convent found themselves caught in the turmoil of the bitter and brutal nationwide Pullman Strike of 1894.
There were the Great Railroad Strike of 1877, the Homestead Steel Strike of 1892, and the Pullman Strike of 1894.
Others in the 'American Workers' series cover specific events in labor history: Nancy Whitelaw's The Homestead Steel Strike Of 1892 (1931798885) covers conflicts between workers and Carnegie and Frick, who had to deal with a powerful labor union; Rosemary Laughlin's The Ludlow Massacre Of 1813-14 (1931798869) tells of a Colorado strike by mine workers which turned into bloodshed, and her Pullman Strike Of 1894 (1931798893) reveals the first major strike at the Pullman Palace Car Company.
Debs in the Pullman Strike of 1894 and young Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb in a sensational Chicago murder trial in 1924.
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The collapse of the Knights of Labor after the Haymarket Affair of 1886 and the failure of the American Railway Union in the Pullman strike of 1894 cleared the way for the American Federation of Labor by discrediting industrial unions campaigning for radical political change.
Hard times served only to intensify labour problems as shown by the Pullman strike of 1894.
Debs came out of the railway labor movement and achieved prominence as leader of the great Pullman strike of 1894.
The resulting Pullman Strike of 1894, possibly the most famous strike in American labor history, paralyzed much of the commerce in the western half of the Nation before being broken by an alliance of railroad management and the full legal and military power of the Federal Government.