pupillary reflex

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Related to Pupillary light reflex: accommodation reflex

pupillary reflex

[′pyü·pə‚ler·ē ′rē‚fleks]
(physiology)
Contraction of the pupil in response to stimulation of the retina by light. Also known as Whytt's reflex.
Contraction of the pupil on accommodation for close vision, and dilation of the pupil on accommodation for distant vision.
Contraction of the pupil on attempted closure of the eye. Also known as Westphal-Pilcz reflex; Westphal's pupillary reflex.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pupillary light reflex was positive prognostic indicator and three of the four dogs which had positive pupillary regained vision which is in agreement with earlier findings (Miller, 2001).
Mean [+ or -] standard deviation pupillary light reflex parameters.
Elderly subjects have prolonged recovery times of the pupillary light reflex, consistent with a sympathetic deficit.
The NPi([TM])-100 Pupillometer uses infrared imaging technology to measure the pupil's response to light stimulus, removing subjectivity and variability in the measurement of pupil size and the pupillary light reflex.
Specifically, the globe was evaluated for gross abnormalities, a Schirmer tear test I was performed (Schirmer tear test strips, Intervet Schering, Boxmeer, Netherlands), and ocular reflexes, including palpebral, menace, and direct pupillary light reflex (PLR) were recorded.
Ofri (2008) reported presence of pupillary light reflex as an important sign for prognosis.
Menace reflex, corneal reflex, pupillary light reflex were absent, but palpebral reflex was present in affected eye in both cases.
Neuro-ophthalmic examination was performed, and menace response, dazzle reflex, direct pupillary light reflex, and palpebral and corneal reflexes were assessed.
Palpebral reflex was normal but the pupillary light reflex could not be observed due to opacity.
8-15) In the case described here, mydriasis and absence of a direct pupillary light reflex OS were suggestive of an afferent or efferent defect.
Pupil diameter was measured with a pupillary gauge, and pupillary light reflex was assessed by using a standard light source from time zero (Tbase) to 250 minutes after application (T250).