pyracantha


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pyracantha

(pĭr'əkăn`thə) or

firethorn,

any hardwood evergreen shrub of the genus Pyracantha of the family Rosaceae (roserose,
common name for some members of the Rosaceae, a large family of herbs, shrubs, and trees distributed over most of the earth, and for plants of the genus Rosa, the true roses.
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 family). Native from S Europe to W China, pyracanthas are now cultivated elsewhere (often as hedge plants or espaliered on walls) for their red fruits and spiny branches. P. coccinea, also called everlasting thorn, is the most popular; it now grows wild in parts of North America. Pyracantha is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Rosaceae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clematis requires very little pruning, the hydrangea and ivy need no support, honeysuckle is beautifully fragrant, and pyracantha is bold but stays small and manageable.
Rothschildianus' has yellow berries, so if you mix this with Pyracantha 'Golden Dome' and the holly Ilex aquifolium 'Bacciflava', you'll have a sunny yellow corner.
The zoo has to keep pesticides out of the insects' food, too, a challenge for a place that needs more than a dozen branches of pyracantha a week.
A PYRACANTHA has lovely white flowers then yellow, orange or red berries.
For red or orange berries or other fruits, consider cotoneaster, crabapple, hawthorn, pyracantha, silver buffaloberry, and sumac.
Or, if you want berries, both pyracantha and cotoneaster will give you masses of small white flowers beloved by insects, which are then followed by berries.
PYRACANTHA is expected to kick on in the Betfair Commits PS40 Million To British Racing Handicap Chase at Ludlow.
Prune pyracantha, cutting back the side shoots to two or three leaves from their base.
This autumn has produced the largest crop of berries the pyracantha hedge by our living room window has ever seen.
Pyracantha has berry interest and elaeagnus will provide a dense evergreen screen.
Trim pyracantha, so that your autumn and winter berry display doesn't disappear under this year's new growth Trim dwarf hedges of lavender, rosemary and santolina, but don't cut back into the old wood Collect ripening seed from plants you wish to propagate Take cuttings from tender perennials such as pelargoniums and fuchsias Lift and dry onions Harvest the first apples and pears Complete summer pruning of wisteria, if you haven't already done so Ensure birds have fresh water and keep ponds topped up Mow less frequently if the weather is hot and dry Prune rambling roses Keep harvesting young crops including courgettes and summer cabbages
And perhaps there is a garden directly below - roses perhaps, or a pyracantha - in which case, should retrieval be desirable, it may prove hazardous.