Pyrene


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Pyrene

 

an aromatic hydrocarbon; pale yellow crystals. Melting point 150°C; boiling point, 390°C. It is freely soluble in ether and benzene, and has limited solubility in alcohol; insoluble in water.

Pyrene is a constituent of the anthracene fraction in coal tar; it can be obtained from coal tar and petroleum cracking products. It is the raw material for the preparation of certain semifinished products in the manufacture of polycyclic dyes—for example, 3-nitropyrene, tetrachloropyrenequinone, and naph-thalene-l,4,5,8-tetracarboxylic acid.

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Measurement of benzo (a) pyrene in the ambient air for the estimation of carcinogenic risk.
The largest difference in liquid phase samples was observed in Anthracene (5 times) and Phenanthrene (2 times) compounds, whereas the largest difference in solid samples was observed in Pyrene (2.
This phenomenon is explained through a toxicological mechanism (25) whereby the absorption and re-absorption of PAHs increase and/or the process of pyrene metabolism changes through the suppression of the action of cilia in the upper respiratory tract by smoking.
Upon photoactivation by UVA and/or visible light, pyrene potentiates reactive oxygen species that induce single strand DNA breaks.
To establish PAH toxicity, benzo (a) pyrene (Bap) is usually used as reference because of its high toxicity (Culp et al, 1988).
Microbiota incubated for a 2-week period in pyrene (line 3) showed the presence of band 2 and more predominance of band 4, suggesting facility to grown and survive into the medium when supplied with these nutrients, showing certain dependence to the production and activation of catabolic enzymes responsible for degradation of pyrene.
Benzo (A) Pyrene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were found in Dwr Cymru water at a property near Merthyr Tydfil.
Pyrene derivative (4-chloromethylpheny1carbamoy1-1-oxymethylpyrene) was obtained from 4-chloromethylphe-nylisocyanate (1.
In a recent issue of Angewandte Chemie International Edition (45 (2006) 7404), Peter McBreen, ACIC, from the Universite Laval and post-doctoral fellows Stephane Lavoie and Gautier Mahieu report a detailed STM study describing what happens when pyrene and other aromatic molecules adsorb to the surface of platinum.
Levels of all 16 priority pollutant PAHs including naphthalene, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzoanthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[f]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, indenopyrene, benzo[e] perylene, and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene were quantified by comparison with known standards (EPA 1982).
1, a single, well-resolved peak was obtained for each of the pyrene derivatives of internal calibrator and MMA at 4.
When the dendron containing pyrene is covalently attached to the carbon nanotube, there is excimer fluorescence from the pyrene.