QEMU


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QEMU

(Quick EMUlator) Open source software for creating emulation and virtual machine environments, developed by Fabrice Bellard. As an emulator, it is used to run operating systems and applications written for another hardware platform; for example, running ARM software on an x86-based PC.

For virtualization, QEMU is used to emulate devices and certain privileged instructions and requires either the KQEMU or KVM kernel modules and the host operating system to provide a virtual machine environment. It is typically used to run Windows and DOS applications on x86-based Linux computers. For more information, visit http://bellard.org/qemu. See KVM and virtual machine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Before we detail the steps of how to run Doom on Xen on top of QEMU for the Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC, let's review what hypervisors are and how they work in relation to the processors on the Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC.
As per Redhat, a privileged guest user could use this flaw to crash the guest or, potentially, execute arbitrary code on the host with the privileges of the host's QEMU process corresponding to the guest.
Clicking on "Run image" Hob will launch for you an instance of QEMU to run the newly created qemux86 image.
QEMU - Open Source Processor Emulator, "About QEMU," [Online], available: http://wiki.
QEMU offers a virtualized emulation platform to speed development of Android applications on the MIPS architecture.
These sandboxes run malware in a virtualized or emulated environment, such as VMWare [7] and QEMU [8], in order to execute the malware in an isolated system.
For those who haven't heard of QEMU, it is a rather popular open source (GPL 2) virtualization tool similar to VirtualBox and VMWare, which is mostly used on the Linux platform.