quantum cryptography

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quantum cryptography

An encryption method that can detect eavesdropping. Using optical transmission to send a secret key to the other side, quantum cryptography draws on the inherent properties of photons, which become slightly altered if they are observed by an intruder. When an alteration is detected, the receiver knows the sender's key has been compromised. See cryptography.

Polarized and Entangled Photons
One method relies on the polarization of the photons, which will be altered if observed (see QKD). Another method uses photon pairs that exhibit a correlation between them. Any observation along the way weakens the correlation, which can be detected.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main objective of the Quantum key distribution is to detect the intrusion node and improve the secured data packet transmission.
2004) Security of quantum key distribution with imperfect devices.
Marksteiner, An approach to securing IPsec with Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) using the AIT QKD software.
Peterson, "Practical free-space quantum key distribution over 10 km in daylight and at night," New J.
A quantum key distribution (QKD) system does not transmit secure messages, it creates a shared secret between users over unsecured communication links.
Using such a scheme would allow for the first demonstration of global quantum key distribution," the physicists note in their proposal.
Keywords: Cryptography, BB84 Protocol, Quantum Cryptography, Quantum Key Distribution.
Quantum key distribution proposed in the mid-1980s - the best known example of quantum cryptographic tasks - is a radical new way to offer an information-theoretically secure solution to the key exchange problem, ensured by the laws of quantum physics.
This technology will certainly be applied to advance quantum key distribution systems, which have already become commercial products; however, this technology will also lead to innovations in the fields of sensing and metrology.
Topics include methods for extracting encryption keys from volatile memory, an evaluation of spam filtering techniques, a thinning algorithm for fingerprint recognition, quantum key distribution networks, and an area-efficient composite field inverter for elliptic curve cryptosystems.
Although many quantum cryptographic schemes have been proposed [3], [4], the one well researched and realized experimentally is the quantum key distribution protocol (QKD).