Quaoar


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Related to Quaoar: Sedna

Quaoar

The largest known Kuiper Belt object, discovered in June 2002 by Chad Trujillo and Mike Brown of the California Institute of Technology using the 1.2-meter Oschin Telescope at Palomar Observatory. With an estimated diameter of about 1250 km, it is more than 30% larger than (1) Ceres, the largest of the asteroids, and is larger in volume than all the known asteroids put together. It is half the diameter of Pluto but has only 12½% of its volume. Quaoar, which takes its name from the creation mythology of the Tongva, a native American people who once inhabited the area around present-day Los Angeles, orbits the Sun in about 285 years at a mean distance of 42 AU. Its orbit is inclined at an angular of 8° to the ecliptic and has an eccentricity of less than 0.04.
References in periodicals archive ?
New Horizons location in the Kuiper Belt gives the spacecraft a uniquely oblique view of the small planets like Quaoar orbiting so far from the sun.
The spectrum of 2007 OR10 looks similar to Quaoar's, suggesting that what happened on Quaoar also happened on 2007 OR10.
But because Quaoar isn't as big as dwarf planets like Pluto or Eris, it could not hold onto volatile compounds like methane, carbon monoxide, or nitrogen as long.
5 248 Ixion 800 30-49 250 Varuna 900 43 283 Quaoar 1250 42 288 2002AW197 750 41-53 325 Haumea 1500 35-52 285 Orcus 950 30-48 247 Makemake 1600 38-53 309 ORBITAL NUMBER NAME ECCENTRICITY OF MOONS Pluto 0.
Scientists gave a nod to American Indian mythology when they named an icy object found beyond Pluto in 2002 after the Tongva creation deity Quaoar.
One KBO, identified in 2002, has been christened Quaoar, the name the indigenous inhabitants of the Los Angeles Basin gave to the creative force of the universe.
Another large body, Quaoar, which has a diameter of 1,250km, was discovered by the same team behind Sedna two years ago.
Preliminary observations suggest it is 10 per cent larger than 800-mile-wide Quaoar found in 2002.
One comet-like object, Quaoar, recently found floating out around Pluto, is 800 miles across.
The discoverers have named the icy chunk Quaoar (KWAH-o-ar) after a Native American deity.
California astronomers announced last month that they have identified Quaoar (KWAH-oh-wahr), the largest celestial object to be detected since the discovery of Pluto.