Quemoy


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Related to Quemoy: Jinmen, Kinmen Island

Quemoy

(kĭmoi`), Chin. Chinmen, Kinmen, or Jinmen, Taiwanese island group (1990 pop. 81,479), Taiwan Strait, just off Fujian prov., China, and c.150 mi (240 km) W of Taiwan. The group consists of the islands of Kinmen and Liehyu (or Little Kinmen) and 12 islets in the mouth of Xiamen Bay. The town of Kinmen, on Kinmen island, is the chief population center. Farming is the main occupation; about half the land is under cultivation. Crops include sweet potatoes, peanuts, sorghum, barley, wheat, soybeans, vegetables, and rice. Fishing and especially tourism are also important; many sites on Kinmen and Lieyu are preserved in Kinmen National Park. Kinmen island has extensive fortifications, but the government began removing minefields and demilitarizing the island in 2006.

After the Communist victory on mainland China (1949), Quemoy and MatsuMatsu
or Ma-tsu
, Taiwanese island, in the East China Sea, off Fujian prov., China, E of Fuzhou, and c.100 mi (160 km) from Taiwan. Along with Quemoy, it remained a Chinese Nationalist outpost after the Communist victory on the mainland in 1949.
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 remained Nationalist outposts. For many years the islands were subjected to periodic bombardment from the Communist mainland. An incident in 1958 led to the deployment of the U.S. 7th Fleet, but an escalation of hostilities was avoided. The islands are no longer an important point of contention, and Taiwan reduced the military forces stationed there after 1990. Civilian rule was restored in 1993, and restrictions on travel to Quemoy were ended in 1994. Direct travel to and trade with the mainland has been permitted since Jan., 2001, and Kinmen island is now popular with Chinese tourists visiting Taiwan.

Quemoy

an island in Formosa Strait, off the SE coast of China: administratively part of Taiwan. Pop. (with associated islets): 53 237 (1996 est.). Area: 130 sq. km (50 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
China Confrontation over Quemoy and Matsu in 1954-1955: Contingency, Luck, Deterrence?
The distinguished British historian, Margaret MacMillan, believes that Mao Tse-tung may have concluded that it was in the best interest of the PRC to leave Quemoy and Matsu in the hands of the Nationalists.
In 1958, China bombed Quemoy for weeks when it tried to seize the islets, which have strategic and military value.
23, 1958, the mainland began shelling Kinmen, then known as Quemoy, for 44 days, killing some 1,000 people on the isle with nearly half-a-million artillery shells.
She draws parallel narratives of how the two world leaders met in a momentous (if stilted) handshake, and she peppers her analysis with fascinating details, such as what led to Mao's 1958 decision regarding the off shore islands of Quemoy and Matsu and the American commitment to defend Taiwan.
His forthcoming book is Island on the Frontlines: Quemoy in the Cold War, 1949-1992.
1958 China menaced Taiwan in Quemoy and Matsu incidents.
He started shelling the small islands of Quemoy and Matsu in 1954, hoping that the U.
Joint Chiefs of Staff recommended using atomic bombs on China in the conflict over Chiang Kai-shek's troops on the islands of Quemoy and Matsu.
Following the Chinese shelling of the islands of Quemoy and Matsu, off China's coast in the Taiwan Straits, the U.
In some way, this would almost mirror the difficult choice Mao had to make in 1950 when he had to decide between action in Korea or action against Matsu and Quemoy.
50] The Chinese remember the nuclear threats that the United States used during crises over Quemoy and Matsu in the 1950s.