Don Quixote

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Don Quixote

 

(also Don Quijote), the hero of M. Cervantes’ novel El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha (2 vols., 1605-15).

While wandering about the ruined and oppressed Spain of the late 16th century, Don Quixote is always prepared to undertake knightly deeds in the name of love for humanity, even though life roughly crushes his illusions. The incongruity of the latter with historical reality leads to innumerable ironical and grotesque situations. Don Quixote embodies the tragedy of a humanist who becomes convinced that the ideals of justice and harmony in human relations cannot be realized. His tragicomic and humanistic meaning has universal human significance. Don Quixote, the “knight of the doleful countenance,” has been variously interpreted in works of world literature and art, and his name has come to be used to designate a man who is noble, bold, and magnanimous but remote from reality. Don Quixote has often been mentioned in the critical and journalistic essays of many Russian writers, including V. G. Belinskii, N. A. Dobroliubov, D. I. Pisarev, I. S. Turgenev, M. E. Saltykov-Shchedrin, F. M. Dostoevsky, and A. V. Lunacharskii.

REFERENCES

Turgenev, I. S. “Gamlet i Don-Kikhot.” In Polnoe sobranie sochinenii i pisem v 28 tomakh. Soch., vol. 8. Moscow-Leningrad, 1964. Pages 169-92.
Derzhavin, K. N. Servantes: Zhizn’ i tvorchestvo. Moscow, 1958. Snetkova, N. Don Kikhot Servantesa. Moscow-Leningrad, 1965. Servantes i vsemirnaia literatura: Sb. statei. Moscow, 1969. Predmore, R. L. The World of Don Quixote. Cambridge (Mass.), 1967.

M. A. GOL’DMAN

Quixote, Don

knight-errant ready to rescue distressed damsels. [Span. Lit.: Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

spends his life redressing the wrongs of the whole world. [Sp. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

falls into a trance and has visions of Montesinos and other heroes. [Sp. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

ascribes all his misfortunes to the machinations of enchanters. [Span. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

completely taken in by all the tales and plans of his squire and others who humor his delusions. [Span. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

attacks windmills thinking them giants. [Span. Lit.: Don Quixote]
References in periodicals archive ?
Even more intriguing, Don Quijote contains numerous ironic allusions to Gresham's Law.
Besides offering a fresh perspective on the distinct between private art and public performances, the Quijote Wallah Project makes a bold comment on the age- old conflict between old values and new ideas.
Sin llegar a esos fractales extremos, la sospecha que arroja la primera nota sobre la fiabilidad del narrador remite irremediablemente al mismo elemento en la obra de Cervantes y es inevitable reconocer el montaje de los supuestos estratos autorales que Borges replica en su cuento y que manosamente recuerda con la estrategica mencion del noveno capitulo del Quijote cervantino (45).
Barros contends that, "Don Quijote es una novela de incongruencias ideologicas latentes" [Don Quijote is a novel full of latent ideological incongruities], which make the novel an ideal site for ideological critique (Barros).
MASUD-PILOTO, supra note 20, at 57; see also Don Quijote,
A key work in this respect is Ruperto Chapf's 1902 zarzuela La venta de Don Quijote (the topic of a fine article here by Juan Lopez Patau), in which Cervantes, staying in an inn, witnesses events that he subsequently decides to incorporate into the book he is writing.
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n PEDRO was born and raised in the Spanish region of La Mancha, an area made famous by the literary character Don Quijote.
Ife on illness in Don Quijote,, Persiles y Segismunda, and three of the novelas ejemplares); the next three turn to theater (Anthony Lappin on Lope's Caballero de Olmedo, Jeremy Robbins on Calderon de la Barca's Eco y Narciso, and Bruce Swansey on the topos of the labyrinth in comedias by Tirso de Molina, Calderon de la Barca, Lope de Vega, and Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz).
Two chapters of this collection focus our attention on Ovid's influence on early modern Spanish literature, represented by Cervantes's subversion of Phoebus and Phaeton in Don Quijote (McCaw) and Luis de Gongora's use of Ovidian imagery in the baroque poem Soledades.
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