Porcupine

(redirected from Quill pig)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

Porcupine

(pôr`kyəpīn'), river, 448 mi (721 km) long, rising in the Ogilvie Mts., NW Yukon, Canada. It flows in a great arc NE through the Eagle Plain, then W into Alaska and to the Yukon River (of which it is a main tributary) at Fort Yukon. The river was explored (1842) by John Bell, a chief trader for the Hudson's Bay Company.

porcupine,

member of either of two rodentrodent,
member of the mammalian order Rodentia, characterized by front teeth adapted for gnawing and cheek teeth adapted for chewing. The Rodentia is by far the largest mammalian order; nearly half of all mammal species are rodents.
..... Click the link for more information.
 families, characterized by having some of its hairs modified as bristles, spines, or quills. The quills are loosely attached to the porcupines' skin and pull out easily, remaining imbedded in any predator that comes in contact with them. The New World, or tree, porcupines (family Erethizontidae) are slow-moving, more or less arboreal animals. The ends of their quills bear minute overlapping barbs; when imbedded they are very difficult to pull out and tend to work inward, piercing internal organs. The North American, or Canadian, tree porcupine, Erethizon dorsatum, is found in wooded areas over most of North America, excluding the SE United States. This animal has a coat of long, shaggy, brown or black hair mixed with shorter quills. When threatened it erects its quills and backs toward its enemy, delivering a blow with its tail. Even if no contact is made quills may fly out; this has given rise to the erroneous belief that porcupines can shoot their quills. North American porcupines spend the day, singly or in groups, in rock cavities, hollow logs, or burrows. At night they forage in trees, feeding on leaves, buds and bark. They subsist in winter entirely on bark stripped from evergreens. The damage they do to trees is conspicuous, but seldom fatal. The Central and South American tree porcupines, species of the genus Coendou, have naked-tipped, prehensile tails, with which they hang from branches. Also called coendous, they are up to 20 in. (50 cm) long, including the tail, which is as long as the body. The Old World porcupines (family Hystricidae) have no barbs on their spines. The larger species belong to the genus Hystrix, and are found in scrubby areas in Asia, Africa, and SE Europe. These animals are unable to climb trees. They have extremely long black-and-white-striped quills on the hind part of the back and on the tail; some species also have crests of long bristles on their heads. The rest of the coat is a mixture of bristles or spines and short hair. The tail quills are hollow and are used to make noise; when the animal is alarmed it erects its quills and rattles its tail. If attacked it runs backwards into its enemy, leaving the attacker full of quills. It forages at night for roots and other plant foods, scuffling and grunting as it moves about. Old World porcupines dig deep burrow systems, where a number of them may live in adjoining burrows. Members of most species weigh 50 to 60 lb (23–27 kg); despite their large size they can move swiftly when alarmed. Species of several other genera, smaller and possessing spines or bristles, but no quills, are found in Africa and SE Asia; these are good tree climbers. Porcupines are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
..... Click the link for more information.
, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Rodentia, families Erethizontidae and Hystricidae.

Porcupine

 

a mining center in central Canada, in the province of Ontario. Porcupine is situated at Porcupine Lake, near a gold ore deposit, discovered in 1909. The deposit is associated with high-temperature hydrothermal deposits of gold-arsenopy-rite and is located between Precambrian granitic massifs and metamorphic rocks. Approximately one-half of the gold mined in Canada is obtained at Porcupine. Silver-copper-zinc ores are also mined in the region—at Kidd Creek and elsewhere.


Porcupine

 

a river in Canada and Alaska, a right tributary of the Yukon. The Porcupine measures 953 km long and drains an area of 78,000 sq. km. Originating in the Nahanni mountains of the Mackenzie Mountains it is fed primarily by snow. There is high water in June and July. The Porcupine is frozen from October through April or May. The lower course is navigable by small vessels.

porcupine

[′pȯr·kyə‚pīn]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of about 26 species of rodents in two families (Hystricidae and Erethizontidae) which have spines or quills in addition to regular hair.

porcupine

any of various large hystricomorph rodents of the families Hystricidae, of Africa, Indonesia, S Europe, and S Asia, and Erethizontidae, of the New World. All species have a body covering of protective spines or quills

Porcupine

(dreams)
Old dream interpretation books say the porcupine in your dreams is an omen of good news and bad news. Good things may happen to you, but they will carry difficulties with them. From a more pragmatic point of view, porcupines are cute but untouchable animals. As a dream symbol it may represent a situation or a person in your life who fits that description.