RNA

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Related to RNA viruses: Dna viruses

RNA:

see nucleic acidnucleic acid,
any of a group of organic substances found in the chromosomes of living cells and viruses that play a central role in the storage and replication of hereditary information and in the expression of this information through protein synthesis.
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RNA

(biochemistry)

RNA

Biochem ribonucleic acid; any of a group of nucleic acids, present in all living cells, that play an essential role in the synthesis of proteins. On hydrolysis they yield the pentose sugar ribose, the purine bases adenine and guanine, the pyrimidine bases cytosine and uracil, and phosphoric acid
References in periodicals archive ?
The Company's most advanced drug candidate is SB 9200, a potential breakthrough for the treatment of a wide range of RNA viruses including HBV, RSV, and HCV, works by up-regulating the host immune response in the presence of viral infection.
RNA viruses have ribonucleic acid as their genetic material (rather than deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA).
Many virologists had suspected that RNA viruses like born a virus were much older than estimates based on mutation rates.
Until now, a number of RNA viruses have been isolated from bats, but isolation of DNA virus is rare (1).
Our work indicates that multiple target sequences can be encapsulated into a single armored RNA species to serve as a common calibrator for detection of different RNA viruses.
RNA needs to be converted into DNA because genomes of the SARS virus consist of RNA viruses, it said.
Baltimore shared the 1975 Nobel Prize in Medicine with Howard Temin for their work on the mechanism by which cancer-causing RNA viruses establish themselves inside healthy cells.
However, the polymerases of RNA viruses do not have this helix structure.
Recent advances in determining the atomic and subnanometer capsid structures of double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses and the structures of a number of individual viral proteins have provided insight into events in the viral life cycle, including attachment and entry, genome replication, gene expression, and capsid morphogenesis.
Recently, we developed a new method for detecting RNA viruses.
Curiously, the phi6 RNA viruses, which play the prisoner's dilemma in certain conditions, play the snowdrift game in others.
In an article in the 1998 book Pathology of Emerging Infections 2, Johns Hopkins international health professor Donald Burke wrote that RNA viruses may be one of the biggest concerns, because they can mutate, recombine, and cross between species so rapidly.