Radiation Balance

Radiation Balance

 

of the atmosphere and underlying surface, the net amount of radiant energy that is absorbed and radiated by the atmosphere and underlying surface. For the atmosphere, the incoming radiation is the amount absorbed of the incident and scattered solar radiation and the long-wave (infrared) radiation from the earth; the outgoing radiation is the long-wave emission from the atmosphere, which causes a sink of heat, toward both the earth’s surface (back radiation) and outer space.

For the underlying surface, the incoming radiation is the amount absorbed of the incident and scattered solar radiation and the atmospheric back radiation; the outgoing amount is the heat lost from the underlying surface through thermal radiation. Radiation balance is itself a component of the heat balance of the atmosphere and underlying surface.

References in periodicals archive ?
Many researches on radiation balance with Landsat 5 and 7 images have used maximum (Lmax) and minimum (Lmin) radiances in the process of conversion of the gray level into spectral radiance (Bastiaanssen et al.
1] [down arrow] to the downward component of the radiation balance is greater than that of solar radiation (Fig.
These same authors also reported that in a study in the Amazon, the H flux showed similar relationship with radiation balance.
Frost flowers formed and grew overnight in the absence of shortwave radiation, while the net longwave radiation was negative and dominated the net all-wave radiation balance at the surface.
The radiation balance of the active surface as a leading component of the heat balance determines the amount of heat emission in the air and soil.
Changes with regard to radiation balance were based on the variation of solar energy in relation to the exposed surface and land slope (IQBAL, 1983; KAMALI et al.
He asserted that like greenhouse gases, volcanic aerosols perturb the Earth's radiation balance.
The sensitivity of global temperature to changes in the Earth's radiation balance is a key factor in understanding past natural climate changes as well as potential future climate change.
Dimethylsulfide emissions play a role in climate regulation through transformation to aerosols that are thought to influence the Earth's radiation balance," says Oduro, who conducted the research while completing a Ph.
The general lesson drawn from these records is that, as predicted by simple radiation balance models, adding greenhouse gases to the atmosphere leads to warming of the planet.
Thus, in order to model climate change, the radiation balance of the Earth must be determined as a function of all frequencies from radio through the infrared.