radicals


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radicals

(rad -ă-kălz) Highly reactive groups of atoms that do not usually occur under terrestrial conditions but may be relatively abundant in some molecular clouds, where collisions between reacting species happen only rarely. Radicals often have unpaired electrons in their outer shells. CN is an example.
References in classic literature ?
Next to her sat, on her right, Sir Thomas Burdon, a Radical member of Parliament, who followed his leader in public life and in private life followed the best cooks, dining with the Tories and thinking with the Liberals, in accordance with a wise and well-known rule.
I could put up with a good deal of provocation, but, after holding the soundest Conservative principles all my life, I could NOT put up with being called a Radical.
There were other sides, too, to Mr Rackstraw's character, but for the moment let him go as a multi-millionaire City man and Radical politician.
Wolfendon says it is a most unwise thing for a good Radical who wants to retain the confidence of the people to be seen about with a Duchess.
Do you know Sir Harry Otway--a Radical if ever there was?
When he reached the point about the fundamental and radical law, his opponent jumped up and began to protest.
But I believed that some radical change in my life was coming, and would inevitably come that day.
Frankly, though, and don't let it hurt you - I tell you, to show you precisely how you stand with him - he doesn't like your radical views, and he thinks you are lazy.
For as much as a week after this, Tom imagined that his character had undergone a pretty radical change.
Brooke on this occasion little thought of the Radical speech which, at a later period, he was led to make on the incomes of the bishops.
Then the radical change in our diet was not good for us.
As I learned afterward, they had got their previous guest of honour, a brilliant young radical, unskilled in drinking, quite pipped.