Raelians

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A group of Raelians work on sand drawings at a Madellin, Colombia, retreat in 2007. Raelians believe that humans are the creation of the extraterrestrial Elohim.

Raelians

This UFO cult claims to be cloning people under the directive of the Elohim, the extraterrestrial creators of humans on Earth.

In July 2001 the Raelian Movement made headlines around the world when one of its members, Brigitte Boisselier, a forty-four-year-old scientist with doctorates from universities in Dijon and Houston, announced that Clonaid, her team of four doctors and a technician, would soon produce the first human clone. Defying opposition from President George W. Bush, Congress, Secretary of Health Tommy Thompson, and the Food and Drug Administration, Boisselier refused to disclose the location of Clonaid’s two laboratories, other than to state that one was in the United States and the other abroad. Clonaid, established by Ra’l in 1997, is funded in part by $500,000 from an anonymous couple who want a child cloned from the DNA of their deceased ten-month-old son. Ra’l states that such cloning will demonstrate the methods employed by the Elohim in their creation of the human species.

So who is Ra’l?

Claude Vorilhon, a French sports journalist and former race-car driver, claims to have been contacted by an extraterrestrial being while climbing the Puy de Lassolas volcanic crater near Clermont-Ferrand, France, on December 13, 1973. Vorilhon was astonished when he saw a metallic-looking object in the shape of a flattened bell about thirty feet in diameter descend from the sky. A door opened in the side of the craft, and what appeared to be a humanlike being about four feet in height emerged in a peaceful manner. Vorilhon soon learned that the being was a member of the Elohim referred to in the creation story in Genesis, the “gods” who made humans in their own image; they did this, according to Vorilhon, by utilizing deoxyribonucleic acid—DNA.

Vorilhon was told that the Elohim had sent great prophets, such as Moses, Ezekiel, Buddha, and Muhammad to guide humankind. Jesus, the fruit of a union between the Elohim and Mary, a daughter of man, was given the mission of making the Elohims’ messages of guidance known throughout the world in anticipation of the Age of Apocalypse—which in the original Greek meant “age of revelation,” not “end of the world.” In this epoch, which the people of Earth entered in 1945, humankind will at last be able to understand scientifically that which the Elohim accomplished eons ago in the Genesis story.

Vorilhon said that the Elohim renamed him “Ra’l,” which means “the man who brings light.” Shortly after his encounter with the extraterrestrial, he created the Raelian Movement, which soon acquired over a thousand members in France. Today, according to figures produced by the Raelians, their membership includes 55,000 individuals in eighty-five different countries.

Ra’l maintains that he established the Raelian Movement according to instructions given to him by the Elohim. Its aims are to inform humankind of the reality of the Elohim “without convincing,” to establish an embassy where the Elohim will be welcome, and to help prepare a human society adapted to the future. In the years since his first contact experience, he has written a number of books, which can be obtained directly from the Raelians. The titles include The Message Given by Extraterrestrials and Let’s Welcome Our Fathers from Space.

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The fantasist "human cloning company" Clonaid, run by the Raelian cult, which spuriously claimed to have created the first cloned child in 2002, stated (with no apparent irony) in its publicity material that "a surprisingly large number" of the requests it had received "come from the Los Angeles/Hollywood area".
What that biography doesn't mention is that he is the long-time leader of the British branch of the Raelian movement, a religion founded in 1974 by Claude Vorilhon - known as Rael - a year after he reported that an extraterrestrial had come to him in a volcanic crater in France and handed him a message to pass on to the people of Earth.
The International Raelian Movement was behind the banners, according to the group's spokesperson, Thomas Kaenzig.
The swastika's ancient, honorable heritage and positive meaning are well known in many Eastern countries," Thomas Kaenzig, Raelian guide and president of the ProSwastika Alliance, said in a (http://www.
Part III examines, under the cogent subheading mediating immediacy, the role of media technologies in enabling new religious experiences and conveying modes of spirituality (with regard to a Christian movement in Brazil studied by de Abreu), or a sense of divinity (de Witte, comparing a Pentecostal Church and Afrikania, a traditionalist cultural movement, both in Ghana), prophetic charisma (Machado, portraying the leader of the Raelian Movement in France) or moments of possession (Sanchez on Pentecostal squatter movements in Venezuela).
Negar Azizmoradi, the leader of the Iranian branch of the International Raelian Movement, has been granted religious asylum in the United States.
MACHADO, Carly (2009) "Prophecy on stage: fame and celebrities in the context of the raelian movement".
The Constitution says women are equal to men in every sense of the word," the Daily Mail quoted Raelian Lara Terstenjak, one of the protestors, as telling Huffington Post.
The various forms of Buddhism and evangelical Christianity, New Age Movement-related spirituality, Wicca, the Muslim Brotherhood, Nipponzan Myohoji, and the Raelian Church are some of the religions described.
Others may be consoled by the Raelian Movement, a group that says Jackson -- named a Raelian Honorary Guide in 1992 -- probably lives on.
The Raelian movement is a strange religious sect that believes the human soul dies when the body dies so the key to eternal life is cloning - recreating individuals from their own genetic make-up.
Taking as his starting point the Raelian cult that sought this type of perpetual life, Annas argues forcefully but somewhat implausibly that we need an international convention on the preservation of the human species.