Raspberry Pi

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Raspberry Pi

A low-cost Linux and ARM-based computer on a small circuit board sponsored by the charitable Raspberry Pi Foundation in the U.K. (www.raspberrypi.org). The goal of the foundation is to promote computer programming for kids. In 2011, the first prototype was the size of a flash drive with USB on one end and HDMI on the other. In 2012, the circuit board expanded to roughly 3x5 inches, and the Model B, priced at USD $35, became the first commercial product.

There has been a lot of excitement about the unit because it is fairly robust. For example, it can be used as a desktop computer, and its graphics are sufficiently powerful to make it the heart of a media center. It also affords hobbyists and tinkerers an economical computer for myriad projects. See computer on a stick.


The Model B
Priced at USD $35, the 3.3x5.3" Raspberry Pi board can be used in desktop and mobile applications. For $25, the Model A has only one USB port and no Ethernet. (Image courtesy of the Raspberry Pi Foundation.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The Science Minister later visited the Sony UK Technology Centre in Bridgend where he witnessed production of the five millionth Rasberry Pi computer.
Because the Konekt Platform is hardware agnostic, the company is offering reward tiers that package the Konekt Global SIM with familiar Arduino, Rasberry Pi and Beagleboard hardware.
This product features the Rasberry Pi, a no-frills computing device which is claimed to be similar to the one used in smartphones.
The following devices will be showcased in one of the zones: virtual reality helmets, 3D printer, Liquid Galaxy (panoramic system allowing to visit any place in the world for seconds), Rasberry Pi (a credit-card sized computer that plugs into TV and a keyboard), Leap Motion (computer hardware sensor device that supports hand and finger motions as input, analogous to a mouse, but requiring no hand contact or touching).
dizmos are based on HTML5, CSS3 and Javascipt with the intention of developers taking the software further, creating their own dizmos which can then be manipulated and docked together, and also used in connection with popular development platforms such as Arduino or Rasberry Pi.
Developers can even use dizmo to connect applications and services such as Arduino or Rasberry Pi, and it's easy to use and installable on any standard OS such as Windows, Mac OS X or Linux.