Rasselas

Rasselas

prince and his companions search in vain for greater fulfillment than is possible in their Happy Valley. [Br. Lit.: Rasselas in Magill I, 804]
References in classic literature ?
Laurence seemed to suspect that something was brewing in her mind, for after taking several brisk turns about the room, he faced round on her, speaking so abruptly that Rasselas tumbled face downward on the floor.
Hepzibah then took up Rasselas, and began to read of the Happy Valley, with a vague idea that some secret of a contented life had there been elaborated, which might at least serve Clifford and herself for this one day.
He was a quick fellow, and when hot from play, would toss himself in a corner, and in five minutes be deep in any sort of book that he could lay his hands on: if it were Rasselas or Gulliver, so much the better, but Bailey's Dictionary would do, or the Bible with the Apocrypha in it.
In a week he had finished Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia.
The story of Rasselas is that of a prince who is shut up in the Happy Valley until the time shall come for him to ascent the throne of his father.
But a year or two after Rasselas was written, a great change came in Johnson's life, which gave him comfort and security for the rest of his days.
Johnson's Rasselas and a useful dismissal of Milgram's famous studies of obedience, it is the penultimate chapter that concludes the critique of dominant isms.
00) should be able to build on his excellent second behind Rasselas at Carlisle three weeks ago.
The 12-1 shot Rasselas thwarted a gamble on Eeny Mac in the seller and then Rocket Ronnie (3-1 favourite) followed up last month's Hamilton victory in the 1m1/2f handicap.
SAMUEL Johnson's Rasselas is often read either as an open-ended or a failed quest: after the royal travelers abandon their pursued goals--admitting that "none could be obtained"--they commit themselves to the "stream of life" and return to Abyssinia where their journey began (418).
Johnson's philosophical fable, Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia of 1759 (which had owed much to the Portuguese Jesuit Father Jerome Lobo's Voyage to Abyssinia translated from French by Johnson himself in 1735, and which left a mark on Wordsworth's "The Arab Dream" in The Prelude and Coleridge's Kubla Khan), William Collins's Persian Eclogues of 1742 (reprinted as Oriental Eclogues in 1757), Edward Gibbon's The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776-1778), Beckford's Gothic Caliph Vathek of 1786, and William Jones's scholarly works from Arabian, Persian, and Indian sources during the 1770s-1790s.
We have only to think of Samuel Johnson's Rasselas (1759), whose interweaving of fictional narrative with philosophy made the Critical Review argue that it was a book for philosophers, but not for novel readers.

Full browser ?