rate of climb

(redirected from Rate of descent)
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rate of climb

[′rāt əv ′klīm]
(aerospace engineering)
Ascent of aircraft per unit time, usually expressed as feet per minute.

rate of climb

The rate of gain of vertical height per unit of time (i.e., feet/minute or meters/second). The rate of climb is normally calculated when an aircraft is climbing at its specified climbing speed and not in zoom climb. In helicopters, there are two rates of climb: the maximum rate of climb and the maximum vertical rate of climb. A vertical speed indicator (VSI) shows the rate of climb.
References in periodicals archive ?
At this rate of descent to the surface, survival would be unlikely.
There was no sizable increase in the rate of descent between the second and fourth months of life that would have suggested a correlation with the peak incidence of SIDS.
Steps taken in early 2009 to address the foreclosure problem should help to ease the rate of descent for housing as 2009 progresses.
The report also said the helicopter's main rotor disc had struck a fir tree about 30ft below its top and that "the pilotmay have been attempting to arrest a rate of descent and was therefore trying to avoid the rising terrain".
Point the vehicle downwards nose first and it will not exceed six kilometres per hour, regardless of the gradient, while going down backwards reduces the rate of descent to just four kilometres per hour.
A key safety benefit of the T-11 is a significantly slower rate of descent averaging 18 feet per second, resulting in a 25-percent reduction in impact force over the T-10.
The new parachute will reduce the rate of descent by 25 percent from 22 feet per second with the T-10 to an average rate of descent of 18 feet per second for a 385lbs Total Jumper Weight with the ATPS.
The commander, believing he was too high to make a safe automated approach, turned off the autopilot and lowered the nose to increase the rate of descent and make a gradual 360 degree turn.
He evaluated the rate of descent from a pilot's perspective and from the acceptability level of an airline passenger.
The rate of descent in terms of results looks likely to go on for one more game.
The report said that the cause of the accident was the failure to stop the high rate of descent, and the aircraft tilted to the right as it landed.
Since the V-22 program's return to flight, the Osprey has gone through exhaustive developmental testing, highlighted by two at-sea periods and a battery of high rate of descent tests that clearly defined the airplane's robust operating envelope and led to Tom Macdonald, the chief corporate test pilot, receiving the Society of Experimental Test Pilot's prestigious Iven C.