Ratushinskaya


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Ratushinskaya

Irina . born 1954, Russian poet and writer, living in Britain: imprisoned (1983--86) in a Soviet labour camp on charges of subversion. Her publications include Poems (1984), Grey is the Colour of Hope (1988), and The Odessans (1992)
References in periodicals archive ?
In answer to these questions, we shall first examine the meaning of "hope" in the Christian tradition and its specific adaptation by Mandelstam and Ratushinskaya to the struggles of their autobiographies.
For her successor, Ratushinskaya, the word "hope" also appears in the title of her prison memoirs, but in a paradoxical sense by which the gray of the concentration camp uniforms becomes the means of providing hope in a politically hopeless situation.
Although it is impossible to show that either Mandelstam or Ratushinskaya was conversant with this theological tradition of hope or with modern Russian Orthodox theology, it is not impossible that they were influenced by the movement in that church emerging from such nineteenth century thinkers as Aleksandr Bukharev, who was also known by his sub-episcopal title of Archimandrake Feodor (1824--1871).
In accord with both their Russian theological ancestors and these Western thinkers, Mandelstam and Ratushinskaya demonstrate by their autobiographies that the focus of Christian hope is not merely individual salvation in the afterlife but also societal freedom and reconciliation in human life on earth as well.
LIKE Nadezhda Mandelstam, Irina Ratushinskaya wrote her autobiography as a memoir to preserve herself and others, in her case, the lives of other women political prisoners in the gulag during the final crackdown by Andropov in the 1980s.
Unlike the Mandelstams, Ratushinskaya and her friends in the camp believed in strong political resistance to the arbitrary dictatorship of the prison camps.
More importantly, Ratushinskaya uses her gifts as a poet throughout her three years in prison.
But neither he nor any of the Soviet delegates addressed themselves to the fate of Ratushinskaya.
During Lent 1986, he locked himself up in a replica prison cell for 46 days on behalf of imprisoned Russian poet, Irina Ratushinskaya.
The Russian poet Irina Ratushinskaya, writing about the labour camps in her memoir, Grey is the Colour of Hope, stated: `If you allow hatred to take root .
Also taking part will be Russian poet Irina Ratushinskaya, who spent four years in Soviet concentration camps during the 1980s.
Six days of the summer at Caux were devoted to a conference on `The life of faith', which was addressed by the Russian poet Irina Ratushinskaya.