GDP

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GDP

(guanosine diphosphate): see guanineguanine
, organic base of the purine family. It was reported (1846) to be in the guano of birds; later (1879–84) it was established as one of the major constituents of nucleic acids.
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References in periodicals archive ?
An economic expansion or increase of real gross domestic product may obtain of course because of either an increase of aggregate demand or an increase of short-run aggregate supply.
There will be another revision in July 2007--as there is every year--but until then the final word from the Bureau of Economic Analysis is that real Gross Domestic Product grew at an annualized rate of just under 2 percent in the third quarter.
Almost 31,000 new jobs are expected to be created in Vancouver in 2006, and real gross domestic product (GDP) is forecast to grow by 4%.
The Daiwa Institute of Research came up with the estimate on an assumption that Japan's real gross domestic product will contract only 0.
8%, and the doubling of the real gross domestic product from 1.
It defines a recession as a significant decline in economic activity spread across the economy, lasting more than a few months, and visible in real gross domestic product, real income, employment, industrial production and wholesale-retail sales.
For more information see "Comparative Real Gross Domestic Product per Capita and per Employed Person, Fourteen Countries, 1960-2002," in the Foreign Labor Statistics section of the BLS Web site.
The peak to trough decline in real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was only 0.
The government believes it can not be optimistic about the nation's economy in fiscal 2002, although it is too early to say whether real gross domestic product (GDP) will shrink that year, the top government spokesman said Monday.
Zimbabwe's real gross domestic product will fall by 4.
By Krugman's own admission, Japan, the only big economy in the world that has suffered a prolonged slump in the 1990s, has had only two years of low single-digit decline in real gross domestic product.