RSS

(redirected from Really Simple Syndication)
Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms.

RSS

RSS

(Really Simple Syndication) A syndication format that was developed by Netscape in 1999 and became very popular for aggregating updates to blogs and news sites. RSS also stood for "Rich Site Summary" and "RDF Site Summary." A source for creating RSS feeds is www.feedforall.com. See syndication format for more on syndication feeds.

RSS Lineage (RSS 1.0 and RSS 2.0)
There are two lineages of RSS. RSS 1.0 conforms to the W3C's RDF specification and was released from the RSS-DEV Working Group in 2000 (see RDF). In 1999, Radio Userland's Dave Winer took over Netscape's RSS 0.91, later upgrading it to Versions 0.92 and 0.94 and turning it over to Harvard in 2003 as RSS 2.0. Most newsreaders support both formats.
References in periodicals archive ?
The free feature relies on Really Simple Syndication, an increasingly popular technology that can compile content from a wide array of Web sites catering to a user's personal tastes.
The site also has a more prominent social media focus, employing quick links to Facebook, Twitter, and a Really Simple Syndication (RSS) newsfeed on the bottom of each page.
RSS: Really simple syndication ( way to get news articles sent to your desktop or web browser.
According to the BBC the service will enable users to gain the benefits of Really Simple Syndication (RSS) technology, without the need to know what RSS is or how it works.
The abbreviation is variously used to refer to the following standards: Really Simple Syndication, Rich Site Summary, RDF Site Summary, or Real-time Simple Syndication.
The acronym stands for one of the following standards: RDF Site Summary, Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication.
Interested parties also can register to automatically receive feeds through Really Simple Syndication, or RSS, a format designed for sharing updated web content such as headlines.
By the end of 2011, site users can expect to see updates such as Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds that enable customers to set preferences to receive email updates on specific NHI subject areas, print and share features, and improvements to the NHI Store to make downloading electronic documents faster and easier.
Bibby Financial Services issued the warning after UK Business Barometer research showed that just 23% of small businesses felt confident in their knowledge and understanding of new tools such as blogs, podcasts and Really Simple Syndication (RSS).