recusant

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recusant

1. (in 16th to 18th century England) a Roman Catholic who did not attend the services of the Church of England, as was required by law
2. (formerly, of Catholics) refusing to attend services of the Church of England
References in periodicals archive ?
As this reveals, the Simpson players did not confine themselves to performing before recusants despite their reputation as popish players, just as they did not confine the membership of the troupe to recusant Catholics.
39) It had the added flavor of opposing a recusant Catholic against a loyal Protestant.
cial returns of recusants are notoriously selective, but at a time of crisis for the established church in 1702 Catholicism in Wootton was estimated as about a quarter of the population.
focuses on the political ideas of the recusant community, but his careful navigation of the waters of religious conscience makes his excellent book also a fascinating read for theologians and those interested in political theology.
The areas covered include lay-clerical collaboration in Dutch Catholic communities, the role of the clergy and laity in areas denominated 'missions', mixed marriages in Holland, relations between Recusants and their neighbours in England, burial of the dead in the Dutch Republic, the effect of the Reformation on Catholic ritual life in England, the use of the Southern Netherlands as refuges for English Catholics, a look at Recusants in Ireland, Catholic women in England, the care of orphans in Holland and the relationship between Catholic minorities and art.
We may be accustomed to seeing those dour religious recusants as the very embodiment of melancholic exile, performing their "errand in the wilderness," but no, says Wilson, "they believed that America, that fresh and innocent country, would fulfill all their desires for religious bliss.
He published a condemnation of the recusant priest Edmund Campion, when Campion was captured and executed in 1581; Munday dedicated a book to Richard Topcliffe, chief torturer for Elizabeth and James and eager persecutor of recusants; Munday published two sermons by John Calvin; and at least once in his long career Munday took service with the crown as a "pursuivant" or warrant officer, charged to find, inform on, and assist in the apprehension of traitors, especially recusants.
Was the chaos it created--the multiple nonconformist sects, the embattled recusants, the High and Low Church possibilities--an enrichment of a kind: God taken seriously instead of the traditional performance of a liturgy?
Milward in his essay, "Meta-drama in Hamlet and Macbeth," responds to what he sees as post-play considerations in Shakespeare, that is implications not readily provable, that Shakespeare's plays reflect the anguish of English recusants, torn between the accommodation and resistance (which Milward sees as the fundamental dilemma of Hamlet's "To be or not to be").
In the most important discussion of this repertory since Joseph Kerman's from twenty-five years ago, Brett not only rearticulated Byrd's ambitious liturgical plan for Gradualia, sorting out the composer's notoriously complicated, cryptic, at times inconsistent system for transferring musical sections from feast to feast, but also suggested a political plan for the collection: Byrd had begun with feasts most important for beleaguered recusants and Jesuits, then moved on to major Christian feasts.
If John Shakespeare was a man of such strong traditional faith that he would resist the pressure of the Elizabethan regime against recusants, his faith was likely to have had an impact on son William as well.