Smoot, Reed

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Smoot, Reed

(smo͞ot), 1862–1941, U.S. senator (1903–33), b. Salt Lake City, Utah. He became successful as a banker and was prominent in the affairs of the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-day SaintsLatter-day Saints, Church of Jesus Christ of,
name of the church founded (1830) at Fayette, N.Y., by Joseph Smith. The headquarters are in Salt Lake City, Utah. Its members, now numbering about 5.
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. He was the first Mormon to be elected (1902) to the U.S. Senate. Efforts were made to bar him from his seat because he was a Mormon, but he was seated after a Senate investigation. Smoot, a conservative Republican, joined the "irreconcilables" in opposing the League of NationsLeague of Nations,
former international organization, established by the peace treaties that ended World War I. Like its successor, the United Nations, its purpose was the promotion of international peace and security.
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 and was one of the group that worked for Warren G. HardingHarding, Warren Gamaliel
, 1865–1923, 29th President of the United States (1921–23), b. Blooming Grove (now Corsica), Ohio. After study (1879–82) at Ohio Central College, he moved with his family to Marion, Ohio, where he devoted himself to journalism.
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's nomination (1920). In his later years in the Senate he was chairman of the finance committee; he helped write the Hawley-Smoot Tariff ActHawley-Smoot Tariff Act,
1930, passed by the U.S. Congress; it brought the U.S. tariff to the highest protective level yet in the history of the United States. President Hoover desired a limited upward revision of tariff rates with general increases on farm products and
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 (1930), which he cosponsored with Oregon Representative Willis C. Hawley.

Smoot, Reed (Owen)

(1862–1941) U.S. senator; born in Salt Lake City, Utah. A prominent Mormon business and religious leader, he was elected to the U.S. senate (Rep., Utah; 1903–33). He became an influential figure in the Senate, advocating protectionist policies, tax reduction, and the creation of national parks. He coauthored the Smoot-Hawley Tariff of 1930, which increased tariff rates. After being defeated in 1932, he returned to Utah to devote himself to his duties as an apostle of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.
References in periodicals archive ?
Senator Reed Smoot and Representative Willis Hawley made the same empty promise in 1930, leading to protectionist tariffs that exacerbated the Great Depression and destabilised the international order.
In short, the manufacturing sector in the late 1920s found itself with excess capacity, prompting Senator Reed Smoot and the Republican Party to propose another upward revision of the tariff schedule.
The Smoot-Hawley tariff was sponsored by Senator Reed Smoot and Representative Willis Hawley, and, strictly speaking, it should be called the Hawley-Smoot tariff if one follows the convention of placing the name of the representative from the House first.
Some specific subjects explored are Mormon contributions to young adult literature, political cartooning and the Reed Smoot hearings, and Mormons in the New York World's Fair 1964-65.
The election of Reed Smoot, a practicing polygamist and apostle of the church, as a senator in 1903 inspired a public debate over whether a member of the LDS Church would uphold the laws of the land when they collided with the laws of his church.
and then through the Senate Finance Committee, chaired by Senator Reed Smoot (R-Utah).
Douglas Irwin opens his book on the Smoot-Hawley tariff with a 1993 photo of Vice President Al Gore introducing Larry King and Ross Perot to the work of the late Senator Reed Smoot and Representative Willis Hawley.
Between 1903 and 1907, the United States was engaged in a very public, political trial of the credentials of Utah's newest senator, Reed Smoot.
But if you say that you favor protection from imports, you are painted into a corner with Reed Smoot and Willis C.
As a rookie reporter for the New York World, Heywood Broun was told to interview Utah Senator Reed Smoot.
Originally published along with other government business in four volumes spanning over three thousand pages, The Mormon Church on Trial: Transcripts of the Reed Smoot Hearings is an abridged, annotated, one-volume collection designed to make the Reed Smoot hearings (1904-06) accessible to readers of all backgrounds.
On June 1, 1906, The Evening Gazette published an editorial titled: THE CASE OF REED SMOOT.