natural abundance

(redirected from Relative abundance)
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natural abundance

[′nach·rəl ə′bən·dəns]
(nucleonics)
The abundance ratio of an isotope in a naturally occurring terrestrial sample of an element.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most commonly encountered species, in descending order of relative abundance (individuals detected per point count) were brown-headed cowbird, dickcissel, grasshopper sparrow, and eastern meadowlark.
Overall, the relative abundance results for metal species at sites 1 to 3 revealed that the sediment from these sites had a negative impact on the coastal area.
Without letting the math equation cause a headache, what the WSI explained was the significant variation in changes in relative abundance of ducks at mid-latitudes in North America during the 2009-10 and 2010-2011 seasons.
It was not possible to directly compare the relative abundance distributions of families and FFG populations since they contained the same number of individuals (N) while demonstrating vastly different richness (S).
The objectives of this research were to determine: (1) the relative abundance of migratory and resident wintering raptors on a reclaimed surface mine, (2) potential habitat associations of these raptor species, (3) perch preferences of each species, and (4) morning versus afternoon activity patterns of each species.
Therefore, the information content is 2-fold within such a multiplexed assay: indirectly, the enzymatic activity/expression, and directly, the relative abundance of inactive and active protein variants.
My work has established a correlation between the presence of disease and the presence of archaeal DNA, the severity of periodontal disease and the relative abundance of archaeal DNA in subgingival plaque.
Wetlands are important habitats for small mammals (Bowland & Perrin, 1993; Kristofik, 2001) but research into factors affecting their distribution and relative abundance within wetland landscapes is relatively scanty.
Statistical methods: The significance of differences in Simulium infection rates were evaluated by the chi-square method and the monthly relative abundance of S.
As Mackin shows we may not agree about the meaning of the relative abundance of land in American culture but we would be naive not to realize its importance in our political economy and political culture.
An analysis of trends in relative abundance from four data sources gave conflicting results, with one series in decline, two series increasing, and one series relatively flat.