René de Clercq

Clercq, René de

 

Born Nov. 14, 1877, in Deerlijk; died June 12, 1932, in Bussum, Holland. Belgian writer. Wrote in Flemish.

Clercq’s popular patriotic songs were close in spirit to 17th-century Hessian songs. Social motifs pervade his poetry collections— Poems (1907), Torches (1909), and The Call of the Bugle (1917)—and his novels, which are filled with humor and love for simple folk— Het Rootland (1913), and Harmen Riels (1913). His lyrical love poems (The Book of Love, 1921) are erotic. Clercq’s autobiographical novella On the Earth (1930) has an antireligious and democratic orientation.

REFERENCES

Wijnstroom, J. J. René de Clercq. Bussum, 1938.
Duinkerken, A. Vlamingen. Hasselt [1959].
References in classic literature ?
She loved to put up lunches for him when he went hunting, to mend his ball-gloves and sew buttons on his shooting-coat, baked the kind of nut-cake he liked, and fed his setter dog when he was away on trips with his father.
The balance all went for actual votes, and on a day of Democratic landslides they elected "Scotty" Doyle, the ex-tenpin setter, by nearly a thousand plurality--and beginning at five o'clock in the afternoon, and ending at three the next morning, Jurgis treated himself to a most unholy and horrible "jag.
My sporting dogs consist of two pointers, two harriers and two setters.
We will enter very softly and stand still in the open doorway, without awaking the glossy- brown setter who is stretched across the hearth, with her two puppies beside her; or the pug, who is dozing, with his black muzzle aloft, like a sleepy president.
The present case compelled them to dispense with hunting-dogs, and, no matter what Joe's agility might be, he could not be expected to have the scent of a setter or a greyhound.
In sixty dogs, forming six packs, divided as follows: the first, for the stag; the second, for the wolf; the third, for the wild boar; the fourth, for the hare; and the two others, for setters and protection.
The well-groomed chestnut horse and two beautiful setters could leave no doubt that the rider was Sir James Chettam.
One white man, having seen his dog, a setter, torn to pieces before his eyes, drew a revolver.
At one time they would beat a field like a setter dog, and drop down in an instant on a mouse unaware of them.
I'm getting a lovely Gordon setter for a Christmas present for Gilbert.
Some highly competent authorities are convinced that the setter is directly derived from the spaniel, and has probably been slowly altered from it.
The eyes did not notice me, but sparkled with glee on beholding Sancho, my beautiful black and white setter, that was coursing about the field with its muzzle to the ground.