Renewability


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Renewability

The ability for resources, such as wood or water, to be replenished after being harvested for products. This ability depends both on the resource’s natural rate of replenishment and the rate at which the resource is withdrawn for human use.
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The insurance market reforms in the legislation address comprehensive major medical insurance coverage and not plans considered excepted benefits from the portability, access and renewability requirements of HIPAA.
Our state law has required guaranteed availability of coverage to every small employer and individual, guaranteed renewability, provides a modified community rating and sets a minimum medical loss ratio of 80% in the individual and small employer markets.
The touchstone is "renewable," so much so that hugely preferential energy rates and tariffs are gifted to those schemes that can claim sustainable renewability, namely wind and solar power.
Under LEED-2009, GreenQuest cabinetry can earn points for: recycled content (particleboard and MDF); use of regional materials if from within a 500-mile radius; the rapid renewability of products (use of bamboo); use of low-emitting wood coatings and composite panel products; and use of FSC-certified species.
As Nicholson realizes, the world is recreated moment by moment; it exists in a constant state of renewability and promise.
The sustainability offering builds on the renewability of paper and Boise's environmental sustainability practices.
Viaccess's Conditional Access System, dedicated to OMA Bcast Smartcard profile standard, provides enhanced security and renewability and reduces SIM management costs for Mobile Operators.
It is purity and translucency, flexibility, renewability and refillability all fit into sustainability.
Tax by megajoule rather than gallon, they say, and promote renewability.
However, Michael Stumpp, head of global specialty polymers and foams at BASF, cautions that "sustainability" goes well beyond renewability.
True renewability means forgetting grain ethanol and nuclear power, for example, while accounting for the vast expenditure of nonrenewable resources that will be required to build a truly renewable infrastructure.