Renga


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Renga

 

(linked verse), a genre of Japanese poetry popular in the 15th and 16th centuries. Several poets, generally three, collaborated on a single renga. Each in turn composed a stanza based on images in the preceding stanza. The result was a chain of stanzas in the form of a tanka, but longer, reaching 100 and sometimes 1,000 stanzas. The classical renga was usually a nature lyric. Its composition, like that of the tanka, was governed by strict rules. A humorous renga, the haikai renga, developed alongside the classical renga and was free in choice of themes and images. The three-line hokku, or haiku, originated from the first stanza of the humorous renga.

REFERENCES

Basho. Lirika. Moscow, 1964.
Grigor’eva, T., and V. Logunova. Iaponskaia literatura. Moscow, 1964.
Literatura Vostoka v srednie veka, vol. 1. Moscow, 1970.
Konrad, N. I. Ocherki iaponskoi literatury. Moscow, 1973.
Konrad, N.I. Iaponskaia literatura. Moscow, 1974.
References in periodicals archive ?
We then explain and present how we co-composed three tanka poems (1) as representations of our reading of the three autoethnographies, as well as a renga poem, (2) which assisted us in synthesizing the three tankas.
In her "Introduction," Renga considers the relationship between Mafia and trauma, underlining the cultural and sociological ramifications connected to it.
In the bravura array of "new poems," we find monorhyme, haiku, a fugue, paragraphs (a form invented by Hayden Carruth, to whom this poem is addressed), three sets of sapphics, two sets of renga composed with Deema Shahabi, four sestinas, alcaics for her daughter's wedding, a double sonnet, the crown of sonnets, four scrupulously perfect ghazals, and the stanza (pentameter aaba) used by Edward Fitzgerald when he translated "The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.
87) sashiai obstacle, barrier [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] it was used when a client wanted to hire a certain courtesan, but she was busy attend-ing one of the client's acquaintances; on such occasion, she would reply sashiai ga aru (you caught me in a bad time) originally it was a rhetoric term used in haikai and renga, but it was gradually borrowed by the courtesans' language.
The seventh chapter looks closely at other aspects of Edo-period secondary nature, discussing the influence of haikai in adding a new layer of vulgar seasonal associations to those already derived from waka and renga, the elaboration of associations through parody, the influence of works on Chinese herbalism, and the effects of printing and Western technology on visual representations of nature.
Lindenberg R, Renga V, Zhu LL, Betzler F, Alsop D, Schlaug G.
Renga, "Spatial resolution of bistatic synthetic aperture radar: Impact of acquisition geometry on imaging performance," IEEE Trans.
You can also find his pieces in the sculpture garden at Renga Arts, a funky locals' gallery that shows off scrap-sourced jewelry, birdhouses, and cocktail carts by artists "inspired by the countryside and good humor of their neighbors," says owner Joe Szuecs.
To the Stars Through Difficulties: A Kansas Renga in 150 Voices" is a collection of poems in the form of the Renga, a variation of the Haiku that embraces collaboration.
And I would guess the synaptic jumps between the components of Japanese renga have been another model for oblique and unapologetic veerings.
As early as 1721, there were printing guilds in the towns that developed around the castles of the samurailords (daimyo), Apart from poetry such as tanka (slvart Japanese poems) and haikai renga (collaborative popular linked verse), prose fiction, such as gesaku (often parodical entertainment literature), or gebun (satirical prose written for the educated samurai-class), developed alongside oral story telling such as rakugo, comical reading by one professional story teller, the kabuki theatrical performances, and the bunraku puppet theatre.