rennet

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rennet,

substance containing rennin, an enzyme having the property of clotting, or curdling, milk. It is used in the making of cheesecheese,
food known from ancient times and consisting of the curd of milk separated from the whey. The Production of Cheese

The milk of various animals has been used in the making of cheese: the milk of mares and goats by the ancient Greeks, camel's milk by the
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 and junket. Rennet is obtained from the stomachs of young mammals living on milk, especially from the inner lining of the fourth, or true, stomach (abomasum) of milk-fed calves. The preparation of rennet was formerly a part of the domestic function of making cheese; the inner membrane was kept in salt, dried, and, when rennet was needed, soaked in water. Now extract of rennet is made and sold commercially. It is usually prepared by soaking the tissues in warm, slightly salted water and straining and preserving the resulting liquid. Heat interferes with the action of rennet.

rennet

[′ren·ət]
(vertebrate zoology)
The lining of the stomach of certain animals, especially the fourth stomach in ruminants.

rennet

1. 
a. the membrane lining the fourth stomach (abomasum) of a young calf
b. the stomach of certain other young animals
2. a substance, containing the enzyme rennin, prepared esp from the stomachs of calves and used for curdling milk in making cheese and junket
References in periodicals archive ?
1/2 tsp liquid rennet or 1/2 rennet tablet, dissolved in 1/4 cup water
During ripening and addition of rennet, keep the milk at 86 degrees.
Originally found in the linings of ruminant stomachs, rennet now comes in animal or vegetarian formulas.
Rennet is used only for making certain types of cheese.
Hansen, a leading enzyme company, said the supply of animal rennet was consistently high through the 1970s.
According to Lutzke, the 1980s saw animal rennet supplies become more inconsistent, resulting in price fluctuations and even product shortages.
By the 1990s, the animal rennet supply became even more inconsistent, making the price of animal rennet very high.
Figure 9 indicated the electrophoretograms of the proteins in the curds of the commercial rennet, enzymes produced by B.
However, the microstructure of the curd from the commercial rennet showed denser and smooth network and less granules.
However, the commercial rennet was the best milk-clotting agent for both clotting time and curd quality as compared with the tested enzymes produced by R.
Modeling milk clotting activity in the continuous production of microbial rennet from Mucor miehei.