Repudiation Day

Repudiation Day

November 23
The Stamp Act of 1765 forced the American colonies to pay a tax on various official documents and publications, such as legal papers, liquor permits, lawyers' licenses, and school diplomas. The tax on newspapers and pamphlets was particularly burdensome, as it was based on the number of printed sheets and advertisements in each publication. The tax had to be paid in British pounds sterling, which made it even more expensive. In defiance of the new law, the court of Frederick County, Maryland, declared that it would carry on its business without the tax stamps required by the Act. In March 1766, the Act was rescinded by Parliament.
The date on which the Stamp Act was repudiated, November 23, has been observed for many years as a half-holiday in Frederick County to commemorate this courageous act. It has been customary for the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) to meet in the courthouse on this day and to listen while the clerk of the circuit court reads the original 1765 decision.
SOURCES:
AnnivHol-2000, p. 195
DictDays-1988, p. 95