Resheph


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Resheph

(rē`shĕf), in the Bible, Ephraim's son.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In the ancient world from the mid-third millennium up until the end of the first century BCE, Resheph was a well-known deity.
The god Resheph is mentioned in documents and appears as a theophoric element in personal names from the mid-third millennium until the end of the first century BCE.
Resheph was an important deity in the Aramaic pantheon of the eighth century BCE.
In Egypt, until the end of the Middle Kingdom, Resheph is found only in foreign personal names.
The Bible associates Resheph with calamity, notably with pestilence, arrows, and fire.
Just as Dever and Resheph appear as the Lord's escorts, the mythologies of many nations describe two gods as accompanying their chief deity, whether in front, alongside, or behind him.
It is possible that rishfei kashet actually refers to the sparks produced by the bow, since in Mishnaic Hebrew and Aramaic Resheph means "spark.
81), que Engnell y Albright identificaron con el consorte de Resheph en el panteon egipcio y cananeo (Ivan Engnell, Studies in Divine Kingship in the Ancient Near East, Uppsala, Almqvist & Wiksell, 1943, p.
Este titulo que podriamos traducir, "la santa", nos remite a representaciones de una diosa semita adorada en Egipto, asociada a otro dios del mismo origen, Resheph y al dios egipcio Min, el intifalico.
Event organiser Eleanor Resheph, aged 21, a classics student, said: "It was a shame about the air space but it went really well.
He and Resheph came to be identified with Nergal, the god of war and sudden death, ruler of the underworld.
Schmidt suggests that it may be a plague deity like Resheph.