bronchiole

(redirected from Respiratory bronchioles)
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Related to Respiratory bronchioles: Alveolar ducts

bronchiole

any of the smallest bronchial tubes, usually ending in alveoli

bronchiole

[′bräŋ·kē‚ōl]
(anatomy)
A small, thin-walled branch of a bronchus, usually terminating in alveoli.
References in periodicals archive ?
2] injures the respiratory tract and has its greatest effect upon respiratory bronchioles (Chauhan et al.
29,100-126) The term diffuse panbronchiolitis refers to its distribution in both lungs (diffuse) and the inflammatory involvement of all layers of the wall or respiratory bronchioles (pan).
Variably extensive and variably severe inflammatory and fibrotic changes caused by tobacco smoke that are found in the terminal bronchioles and respiratory bronchioles are termed, respectively, membranous bronchiolitis and respiratory bronchiolitis.
A morphologic grading scheme for membranous and respiratory bronchioles.
1) The CAP criteria require "discrete foci of fibrosis in the walls of respiratory bronchioles associated with accumulations of asbestos bodies in histological sections.
Intriguingly, these vessels reside in proximity to the respiratory bronchioles, where the conducting zone, or anatomic dead space, transitions into the gas exchange region.
Species with branching respiratory bronchioles between the terminal bronchiole and alveolar ducts have more complex acini.
In the original article of Myers et al, (1) the major pathologic finding was the presence of RB: clusters of slightly golden colored alveolar macrophages ("smoker's macrophages") in the lumens of respiratory bronchioles, alveolar ducts, and in the surrounding alveoli.
The 19th, 20th, and 21st are called respiratory bronchioles and are different from preceding bronchioles in that their epithelium changes form pseudostratified ciliated columnar to squamus, nonciliated.
In contrast, terminal and respiratory bronchioles arising from each pathway revealed varying degrees of wall thickening and remodeling.
The stellate lesions are small, discrete, and centered around respiratory bronchioles and adjacent small arteries, with intervening uninvolved lung parenchyma present.
We also describe the surprising finding of fibrotic lesions of the large bronchi, which is usually restricted to membranous and respiratory bronchioles, in the context of chronic rejection with OB.