reverse discrimination

(redirected from Reverse racism)
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reverse discrimination

see positive DISCRIMINATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
It seems to me that Wales is consumed with reverse racism where non-Welsh speakers are denied jobs in the public sector and even non-Welsh speaking toddlers have been denied access to play-group schemes funded by Welsh language preservationist groups.
They note that claims of so-called reverse racism, while not new, have been at the core of an increasing number of high-profile Supreme Court cases.
Shirley Sherrod made the news in 2010 when she was forced to resign her position as the USDA's Georgia director of rural development after a false charge of reverse racism.
Breitbart and Fox News commentators instituted a debate about reverse racism, completely turning around the historic definition of the term racism.
This anonymity facilitated the generating of an array of candid comments ranging from denial of racism to reverse racism to playing the "race" card.
Racism and brutality, the lack of opportunities, poverty, historical and current official negligence on the part of the city governance and police, and reverse racism, all these socially flammable realities contributed to the, 1992 Los Angeles riots.
Both have been passed over three times for detective, which Denny attributes to reverse racism.
In the two years the Times Union has run 'Maintaining,' some readers have called jokes poking fun at stereotypes reverse racism," wrote Tracy Ormsbee on the Comics Blog.
He proceeds up to the modern day detailing perceived racism that government must be allowed to fix, while ignoring the problems the government's racial fixes have caused: the prevalent reverse racism of modern affirmative action programs.
This will occur not out of any kind of affirmative action, reverse racism or "payback sucker
of Texas, Austin) provides a very detailed account of what transpired over the 12 years of his research, describing how Ladinos viewed the Maya movement and the Guatemalan state in light of neoliberal multiculturalism, the role of the regional in indigenous politics, Ladino racial ambivalence and the issue of reverse racism, and the possibilities of racial healing given the limits of Ladino solidarity.