Rhagionidae


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Rhagionidae

[‚rag·ē′än·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The snipe flies, a family of predatory orthorrhaphous dipteran insects in the series Brachycera that are brownish or gray with spotted wings.

Rhagionidae

 

a family of flies of the order Diptera. Rhagionidae are 5 to 25 mm long and are dark in color. They are predators (they suck the blood of small insects), and many of them feed on earthworms. The larvae live in moist soil, rotten wood, and more rarely in water. There are up to 350 known species of Rhagionidae. They are found in all the countries of the world. There are about 30 species in the European part of the USSR. Rhagio scolopaceus is a widely distributed species. It is about 10 mm long and is yellow gray with dark spots. Rhagionidae usually sit upside down on tree trunks and wait for their prey.

References in periodicals archive ?
4 Dixidae 3 Chaoboridae 4 Ceratopogonidae 1 Chironomidae 3 3 Simulidae 11 7 Anisopodidae 1 Bibionidae 10 15 Mycetophilidae 3 Sciaridae 54 94 Stratiomyidae 1 17 Rhagionidae 4 Cecidomyiidae 3 Scatopsidae 2 Asilidae 2 Empidae 7 Dolichopodidae 11 6 Phoridae 10 15 Pipunculidae 3 Otitidae 7 4 Syrphidae 34 36 Sciomyzidae 1 Sepsidae 2 Tephritidae 1 2 Psilidae Lauxaniidae 5 6 Chamaemyiidae 1 1 Piophilidae 1 1 Heliomyzidae 1 1 Chloropidae 18 43 Anthomyzidae 6 Agromyzidae 12 10 Ephydridae 16 10 Milichiidae 2 15 Drosophilidae 9 4 Anthomyiidae 5 4 Muscidae 7 12 Tachinidae 4 5 Calliphoridae 1 2 Sarcophagidae 2 Lepidoptera 0.
In 1965 Brian published a major paper dealing with the Rhagionidae he collected during his two expeditions to Madagascar (Stuckenberg 1965).
In 1973 Brian helped sort out the heterogeneous muddle of diverse brachyceran flies that at that time represented the Rhagionidae (Stuckenberg 1973).
1 Later Brian provided additional examples of rostrum elongation as a notable adaptation in various families of Diptera, including the Rhagionidae, Tanyderidae, Sciaridae and Ceratopogonidae that are principally associated with the specialised flora of the Cape region of South Africa (Kirk-Spriggs & Stuckenberg 2009: 158-159).
New and little-known South African Rhagionidae (Diptera).
Records and descriptions of Blepharoceridae, Erinnidae and Rhagionidae from South Africa (Diptera).
Stratiomyiidae, Erinnidae, Coenomyidae, Tabanidae, Pantophthalmidae, Rhagionidae.