Rheticus

Rheticus

(Georg Joachim von Lauchen) (rā`tēko͝os, gā`ôrk yōä`khĭm fən lou`khən), 1514–76, German astronomer, mathematician, and first disciple of Copernicus. In 1540 he printed a summary of heliocentric ideas in the Narratio prima and in 1542 supervised publication of the trigonometric sections of Copernicus's masterpiece De revolutionibus. He subsequently persuaded Copernicus to publish (1543) the entire work. To mathematics he contributed Opus palatinum de triangulis, in which for the first time trigonometric functions were related to angles rather than to the arcs of circles.
References in periodicals archive ?
The two companies are working on electrolysis and fermentation processes in a joint research project called Rheticus, said a statement.
Magister Rheticus und seine Schulgesellen: Das Ringen um Kenntnis und Durchsetzung des heliozentrischen Weltsystems des Kopernikus um 1540/50.
And the Sun Stood Still is about the final years of Copernicus' life, as he struggled to complete his research with the aid of a young disciple, Georg Rheticus.
The melanchthon circle, rheticus, and the Wittenberg interpretation of the copernican theory.
Accompanying Rheticus to Prussia, Heinrich Zell in collaboration with Nicolaus Copernicus, produced the first geostatic map of the Prussian coastline and had the first printed map of Prussia with hundreds of towns printed at Nuremberg in 1542.
de Sabunda, Paracelso o Rheticus, se suman a una voluminosa lista de autores que contribuyen a confirmar la tesis de que en la Edad Media nos encontramos con los primeros esbozos de la consideracion de la naturaleza como un libro confeccionado a la medida de nuestro entendimiento.
Rheticus went on to facilitate the publishing of Copernicus' "De Revolutionibus Orbium Celestium" ("On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres") that shockingly put the sun at the center of the universe.
During the turmoil of the Protestant Revolution, Rheticus appears on Copernicus' doorstep, sticks around for two years and ultimately convinces the aging astronomer to publish his theory.
It is not surprising that Copemicus's associate Rheticus accused Pico "of impugning not merely astrology but also astronomy" (127).
The book, Opus Palatinum de Triangulis, written by Georg Joachim Rheticus in the 16th Century, was probably the first to define trigonometry in terms of right-angled triangles.
The west, too, had equally dedicated zealots; Rheticus, who was mentored by Copernicus, along with a team of four others, in a labor of twelve years, generated 388,800 entries of tables for the six standard trigonometric functions to fifteen significant digits in the last seven hundred pages of his Opus Palatinum.
One of the earliest advocates of Copernicus's heliocentric system was Joachim Rheticus, a mathematics professor at the University of Wittenberg.