Rhode Island Red

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Rhode Island Red

 

a breed of chickens raised for meat and eggs. The Rhode Island Red was developed in the United States (Rhode Island and Massachusetts) between 1840 and 1850 by crossing local hens with Shanghai (from India) and Red Malay roosters. The crossbreeds were bred with Brown Leghorns. The plumage is reddish brown, with a black tail having a greenish cast. The males weigh 3.4–3.5 kg, and the females 2.4-2.6 kg. The egg yield is 170 to 180, with some lines laying as many as 210 to 215 eggs. Rhode Island Reds are found in several countries, including the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Denmark, Austria, and Japan. In the USSR, the breed is raised in Novosibirsk Oblast, Stavropol’ Krai, the Ukrainian SSR, and the Lithuanian SSR.

References in periodicals archive ?
Rhode Island White Similar in type to the Rhode Island Red, Rhode Island Whites were developed by crossing partridge Cochins, white wyandottes, and rosecomb white leghorns.
It's getting harder and harder to find the old-type Rhode Island Reds, and they are typically obtained through breeders.
He crossed White Leghorn, Dark Cornish, Rhode Island Red and White Wyandotte, and he later added White Plymouth Rock.
When I later discovered that Rhode Island Reds are poor setters, and not likely to raise chicks for us, I was happy to learn that I didn't need a rooster at all
I chose some Barred Rocks, Wyandottes, Rhode Island Reds, and just for the heck of it, two Cornish Crosses.
The Speckled Sussex, Buff Orpington, Jersey Giant, Australorps, New Hampshire Reds (I'd mention Rhode Island Reds, but I'm New Hampshire born and raised) and most of the Rocks (Barred, Partridge) were, and still are, great choices for barnyard or backyard flocks.
They've been bred by crossing Rhode Island Reds with Barred Plymouth Rocks - the latter breed being used to create the Black Rock, too.
Some "dual-purpose" breeds like Rhode Island Reds or Barred Rocks lay a good number of eggs and also put on weight well for meat.
If it's eggs you want, stick with Leghorns, Rhode Island Reds or Khaki Campbell ducks.
I already had a rooster and a dozen Rhode Island Reds and Plymouth Rocks, but I took them anyway.
Ordinarily, chickens don't lay well in cold weather, but our Rhode Island Reds produced well even during below-zero weather.
So she now raises Barred Rocks, Rhode Island Reds and a Columbian-Wyandotte cross.

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