Right-of-Way


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right-of-way

[¦rīt əv ¦wā]
(civil engineering)
Areas of land used for a road and along the side of the roadway.
A thoroughfare or path established for public use.
Land occupied and used by a railroad or a public utility.

Right-of-Way

 

of railroads, a strip allocated from a country’s lands for a railroad and all of its facilities, such as the roadbed, buildings, and station platforms.

In the right-of-way the permission to erect buildings and other structures is granted only to the railroad. In practice, the width of the right-of-way is no less than 24 m. At railroad stations the width can be considerably greater, because in addition to the railroad tracks, all the structures, buildings, and service facilities of the railroad are located on the right-of-way. In areas where there is drifting of snow or sand, the width of the right-of-way is increased to allow for protective tree plantings.

right-of-way

Any strip or area of land, including surface and overhead or underground space, which is granted by deed or easement for the construction and maintenance of specified linear elements such as power and telephone lines; roadways; gas, oil, water, and other pipelines; sewers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The open, early-successional habitats created by the powerline right-of-way likely favors increased abundance of least chipmunks and North American deermice.
Although rate of capture may have increased in forested habitat due to greater distance from the right-of-way, the higher rate of capture in forested habitat at control sites suggests that availability of water also was a factor.
Although presence of riparian habitats may have influenced our results, we suggest that the right-of-way also had an effect on distribution and density of southern red-backed voles.
We do not believe our data support avoidance of the right-of-way by cinereus shrews.
Least chipmunks were significantly more abundant within the right-of-way at powerline sites.
The influence a right-of-way has on movements often depends on successional stage of the right-of-way, with early succession being a barrier to forest-dwelling species (Gates, 1991).
Although a male southern red-backed vole crossed the right-of-way in its natural movements, the few right-of-way crossings following translocation suggest the right-of-way formed at least a partial barrier to southern red-backed voles.
We believe that retention of downed woody debris in powerline right-of-ways would provide refugia and reduce the impact of the right-of-way on abundance and movement of southern red-backed voles.
Diversity of small mammals in a powerline right-of-way and adjacent forest in East Tennessee.
TABLE 1--Number of individuals captured and diversity of the community of small mammals at three sites that contained a 40-m-wide powerline right-of-way and three control sites in undisturbed forests in Roosevelt-Arapahoe National Forest near Idaho Springs, Clear Creek County, Colorado.