rigid rotor


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rigid rotor

rigid rotorclick for a larger image
In rigid rotor hubs, a gimbal-mounted control consisting of spoke-like fly weights is mounted on the same mast with the rotor. When the pilot deflects the stick, the force applied at A through the swash plate is felt at B, i.e., 90° in the direction of the rotation. This force displaces the rotor from parallel planes, individually changing the blade pitch through shafts from the control rotor blades to respective pitch horns on the main rotor blades. This tilts the rotor disc in the direction of pitch or roll indicated by the original control force.
A rotor head that allows the blades freedom to feather but not to flap or lead-lag. The rotor head has to absorb all the forces generated during flight maneuvers. Control loads in this type of rotor head are high; however, this type imparts the most control power to the helicopter during flight. Rigid rotor heads are expensive to manufacture and maintain because of the materials involved in their construction, but they are the only type of rotor system to give the aircraft some aerobatic capabilities.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dynamics of a rotary system with rigid rotor is modelled simulating gradual degradation of hydrodynamic bearings.
The equations of the lateral motion for a rigid rotor can be obtained from the Lagrangian determined in terms of the Euler angles, as presented in Figure 1.
The four degrees-of-freedom accounted for in the rigid rotor model describe the bending vibration.
In this work, the rotor bearing system model considers the Stodola-Green shaft model in which a rigid rotor is supported by hydrodynamic journal bearings localized on Z = [+ or -] L/2, according to Figure 2.
Stability of a rigid rotor supported on oil-film journal bearings under dynamic load.
Nonlinear dynamic and bifurcation analysis of rigid rotor supported by a relative short externally pressurized porous gas journal bearing system.
His early research and test pilot work centered on improving the handling and stability qualities of rigid rotor and heavy lift helicopters.
The German company decided to use plastics, fibres and foam fillers to manufacture the blades because it realised that their inherent flexibility was sufficient enough to take the strain of the flapping and lead-lag motion which allowed a rigid rotor design to be adopted.
Among the innovative technologies the X2 Technology demonstrator employs are fly-by-wire flight controls, counter-rotating rigid rotor blades, hub drag reduction, active vibration control, and an integrated auxiliary propulsion system.
Fly-by-wire flight controls -- Counter-rotating rigid rotor blades -- Hub drag reduction -- Active vibration control -- Integrated auxiliary propulsion system
Fly-by-wire flight controls -- Counter-rotating, all-composite rigid rotor blades -- Hub drag reduction -- Active vibration control -- Integrated auxiliary propulsion system
Introduction, Causes of unbalance, Types of unbalance, Classification of rotors, Balancing of rigid rotors, Balancing of flexible rotors, Non-conventional methods of rotor balancing, On-line balancing techniques: more details, Some recommendations for balancing