Rinaldo and Armida

Rinaldo and Armida

virgin witch seeks revenge but falls in love. [Ital. Lit.: Jerusalem Delivered]
References in periodicals archive ?
One case is the plate with the two-part version of the Chaconne in Rinaldo and Armida (p.
Sadly it is only the concert suite, but it leaves room for three other ballets, Rinaldo and Armida (1954), Electra (1963) and Sweeney Todd (1959) prepared by David Ellis, the latter a hilarious piece of tongue in cheek.
Rinaldo and Armida recall the duel of love and wrath embodied by Tancredi and Clorinda.
Ruggiero ignores the problem, since he interprets the episode entirely via Tasso's contention in the Discorsi that epic and romance are essentially one genre: Rinaldo and Armida rewrite Aeneid 4 as a romance ending for Dido and Aeneas, transcending both Vergilian epic and the historic destruction of Carthage.
They include such masterpieces as Valses Nobles et Sentimentales, Madame Chrysantheme, Illuminations, and Homage to the Queen, and such important works as The Wanderer, Nocturne, Don Juan, Apparitions, Picnic at Tintagel, and Rinaldo and Armida, and even such early chamber pieces for Rambert as Les Masques.
In place of Boucher's Rinaldo and Armida, Wesley deploys Dagwood and Blondie in erotic abandon; in place of Venus and the infant Bacchus, he portrays Olive Oyl and Swee' Pea, but the lightness of touch and level of allegorical remove are exactly the same, as are the sexy sujets galants, the multitudinous subgenres of Rococo practice.
Her primary source for these conclusions is taken from the story of Rinaldo and Armida, a love story much more developed in Tasso than his predecessors.
63] Still, marital union between Rinaldo and Armida is never explicitly mentioned, much less enacted, within Tasso's poem.
Second only to Dame Margot Fonteyn, she was a luminous jewel during the golden age of the Royal Ballet during the late sixties, creating roles for Sir Frederick Ashton, notably in Rinaldo and Armida, Birthday Offering, Persephone, and Enigma Variations, for John Cranko in Antigone and The Prince of the Pagodas, and for Sir Kenneth MacMillan in Le Baiser de la Fee.
considered a spokesman for the Counter-Reformation" (87, italics added) and that "[bly redeeming sexuality in the reunion scene of Rinaldo and Armida, Tasso goes against the tendency of Cinquecento writers to equate sexuality with the illicit" (102).