rinderpest

(redirected from Rinderpest virus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Rinderpest virus: Nipah virus

rinderpest

or

cattle plague,

an acute and highly infectious viral disease of cattle. It less frequently affects other ruminants, such as sheep, goats, and wild game. After an incubation period of three to nine days, a wide variety of symptoms may appear, including fever, inflammation of the mucous membranes, particularly the intestines, discharges from the eyes and nose, dehydration, and skin eruptions on the back and flanks. Death comes after four to eight days. Long dreaded in Eurasia because of its ability to kill entire populations of cattle, it was accidentally introduced into Africa in the late 19th cent.

Rinderpest was long controlled largely by destroying infected animals, but an effective and economical vaccine was developed in the 1950s and 60s by British veterinary scientist Walter Plowright. By the 1980s, rinderpest occurred primarily in N and E Africa and SW and S Asia as a result of eradication efforts. A global eradication program was begun in 1994 by the Food and Agriculture Organization, which confirmed in 2011 that the disease had been eradicated worldwide.

rinderpest

[′rin·dər‚pest]
(veterinary medicine)
An acute, contagious, and often fatal virus disease of cattle, sheep, and goats which is characterized by fever and the appearance of ulcers on the mucous membranes of the intestinal tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
Responders who answered "yes" were asked to provide further information, including details about the nature and quantity of rinderpest virus held, the name and address of the facility where it was held, and the biosafety/biocontainment level of the facility.
As of June 2015, the survey response rate was 100%, indicating that all OIE Member Countries had fulfilled their obligation to report on remaining stocks of rinderpest virus.
Characterization of immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes on the carboxy terminus of the rinderpest virus nucleocapsid protein.
Vaccination of cattle with attenuated rinderpest virus stimulates CD4(+) T cell responses with broad viral antigen specificity.
Although participatory surveillance was essential in assessing the levels and effect of cattle vaccination (10), wildlife serosurveillance was the primary tool for detecting the presence or absence of circulating rinderpest virus in the final stages of the eradication process (11).
We conducted a questionnaire survey to assess the location and number of rinderpest virus stocks, their uses, and their storage conditions.
It was complemented with the results of a previous questionnaire survey undertaken during 2010 by the FAO and OIE to identify countries holding rinderpest virus stocks and with information obtained from unpublished, or "grey," literature and direct discussions with laboratory staff.
Although rinderpest virus was eradicated after intensive vaccination campaigns in the last quarter of the 20th century (6), PPRV has continued to spread in Africa and Asia.
In parallel, rinderpest virus control and eradication may have favored the decline of cross-immunity in small ruminants and their increased risk for PPRV as predicted earlier by Taylor (38).
The virus is present in Africa (1-3), the Middle East (4), the Arabian Peninsula (5), and southern Asia (6,7) and is closely related to Rinderpest virus (RPV), Canine distemper virus, and human measles virus (8).