risk

(redirected from Risk-taking)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.

risk

at risk
a. Social welfare vulnerable to personal damage, to the extent that a welfare agency might take protective responsibility

Risk

A measure of the probability of an adverse effect on a population under a well-defined exposure scenario.

risk

[risk]
(engineering)
The potential realization of undesirable consequences from hazards arising from a possible event.

risk

The expectation of loss. It is a function of the probability and the consequences of harm. See risk assessment.
References in periodicals archive ?
TABLE 1: Benefits of encouraging Risk and the effects of poor IT Security 2015 Risk-Taking My company IT Security Gross has a encourages risk Domestic positive experimenta- prevents Product influence on tion and testing new growth business testing of ideas performance new ideas China 7.
The team hopes that these findings will provide a way to develop effective cognitive strategies to help these sorts of adolescents to avoid indulging in risk-taking behaviours.
However, in relation to the extensive research on the risk-taking behavior of banks, there are a small number of studies investigating the risk-taking behavior of insurers.
One way to overcome the limitations of self-report methods for assessing SRBs is to use laboratory methods that evoke risk-taking decisions in a real-time fashion that also control for as many extraneous variables as possible, maximize internal validity, and provide opportunities for experimental work that is not feasible using most self-report methods.
Nevertheless, given the recent concerns over excessive risk-taking in corporate America, even this lone drawback appears to have a bright side.
A few empirical studies analyze the incidence of risk-taking behavior with sports and gaming data.
Individuals have different risk-taking propensities, with some--both adults and children--more inclined to take risks than others.
Risk-taking is defined as the perceived probability of receiving rewards associated with the success of a situation that is required by individuals before they will subject themselves to the consequences associated with failure (Brockhaus, 1980).
The workshops focused on integrating information across disciplines and discussed the prevalence and nature of adolescent risk-taking in sex, substance use, criminal behavior, and risky driving, and the potential contributions of neural, biological, intellectual, and socioemotional development; interpersonal, institutional, and contextual influences on risk behavior and how this can inform prevention, health promotion, and treatment interventions; and implications for policy and practice.
Summary: A crackdown on bankers' bonuses has been approved by European regulators in a move to curb excessive risk-taking in the industry.
Dr Crosthwaite is not the first to have warned about the excessive risk-taking of some of those in the City.
A HARTLEPOOL school won pounds 500 for its drama aimed at reducing risk-taking behaviour during the Tall Ships event.