Rita Levi-Montalcini


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Levi-Montalcini, Rita

(lā`vē-mŏn'təlsē`nē), 1909–2012, Italian-American neurologist, b. Turin, Italy, M.D. Univ. of Turin, 1936. A dual citizen of Italy and the United States, Levi-Montalcini did her most important work with Stanley CohenCohen, Stanley,
1922–, American biochemist, b. New York City, Ph.D. Univ. of Michigan, 1948. Cohen did his most important work at Washington Univ. with Rita Levi-Montalcini in the 1950s.
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 at Washington Univ., where she was a professor from 1956 to 1977. Studying mouse tumors implanted in chicken embryos, the pair isolated a nerve growth factor, the first of many cell growth factors found in animals; some of these were also first described by Levi-Montalcini and by Cohen. The discovery of nerve growth factor radically changed the study of cell growth and development. For this discovery Levi-Montalcini and Cohen were awarded the 1986 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Bibliography

See her autobiography, In Praise of Imperfection (1988).

Levi-Montalcini, Rita

(1909–  ) neurobiologist; born in Turin, Italy. While a practicing physician, she resisted German occupation by hiding in Florence and aiding war refugees (1943–45). She taught at the University of Turin (1945–47), then came to the U.S.A. to join Washington University (St. Louis) (1947–77). Her studies of nerve growth factor, isolated in 1952 from cultures of mouse tumor cells, won Levi-Montalcini and collaborator Stanley Cohen the 1986 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. She divided her time between the U.S.A. and the National Research Council in Rome (1961–89), then moved to Rome permanently to be with her twin sister (1989).
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the notable women portrayed in the book include French mathematician Marie-Sophie Germain, known for her work in Elasticity theory, differential geometry, and number theory; Scottish chemist Elizabeth Fulhame, best known for her 1794 work 'An Essay on Combustion'; and Rita Levi-Montalcini, who, with colleague Stanley Cohen, received the 1986 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discovery of nerve growth factor.
Literature Name Year Selma Ottilia Lovisa Lagerlof 1909 Grazia Deledda 1926 Sigrid Undset 1928 Pearl Buck 1938 Gabriela Mistral 1945 Nelly Sachs 1966 Nadine Gordimer 1991 Toni Morrison 1993 Wislawa Szymborska 1996 Elfriede Jelinek 2004 Dorris Lessing 2007 Herta Muller 2009 Alice Munro 2013 Science Name Year Sub-field Marie Sklodowska Curie-- 1903 Physics Marie Sklodowska Curie-- 1911 Chemistry Irene Joliot-Curie 1935 Chemistry Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori 1947 Physiology or Medicine Maria Goeppert Mayer 1963 Physics Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin 1964 Chemistry Rosalyn Sussman Yalow 1977 Physiology or Medicine Barbara McClintock 1983 Physiology or Medicine Rita Levi-Montalcini 1986 Physiology or Medicine Gertrude B.
In the 1950s, Stanley Cohen and Rita Levi-Montalcini isolated nerve growth factor and then discovered epidermal growth factor at Washington University.
The recent death of Italian Nobel laureate and centenarian neurologist Rita Levi-Montalcini highlights one of the lesser known segments of Jewish history in Europe.
In 1986 Rita Levi-Montalcini and Stanley Cohen received the Nobel Prize for the discovery and study of the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF).
This year's summation of research begins with a tribute to and interview with Rita Levi-Montalcini, who turned 100 in April 2009; she discovered nerve growth factor, which helped establish the concept of trophic support for cell growth and differentiation.