Ritchey-Chrétien optics

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Ritchey–Chrétien optics

(rich -ee kray-tyan ) An optical system that is a variation on the Cassegrain configuration and was developed between 1910 and 1920 by George Willis Ritchey and Henri Chrétien. It corrects both spherical aberration and coma at the Cassegrain focus, and therefore gives a high-quality image over a relatively wide field of view. A primary mirror with a hyperbolic profile is used in conjunction with an appropriate departure from classical (hyperbolic) form at the secondary mirror.

Ritchey-Chrétien optics

[′rich·ē ′krā·chən ‚äp·tiks]
(optics)
A modification of the Cassegrain optical system used in large optical telescopes; it has a hyperbolic image-forming primary mirror, no spherical aberration, and no coma; it has a larger usable field than either Newtonian or Cassegrain optical systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
The AT6RC features true Ritchey-Chretien optics with enhanced aluminum coatings, a fully baffled tube assembly, a dual-speed 2-inch Crayford-style focuser, and a Vixen-style dovetail mounting rail.
Paul Jones, Owner-Optician of Star Instruments who has been manufacturing Ritchey-Chretien optics for over 30 years, stated, "RC Optical Systems and I are pleased to have successfully defended our principles to preserve the integrity of the optical design invented by American astronomer George Ritchey and French Astronomer Henri Chretien in the early 1910s.
Some buyers of the RCX400 and LX20OR are happy with their new scopes, but others get angry when they discover that they didn't get genuine Ritchey-Chretien optics at all.
Until recently, if you wanted Ritchey-Chretien optics in a moderate-aperture backyard scope, you had to pay as much as you would for a luxury car.