ritualism

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ritualism

1. emphasis, esp exaggerated emphasis, on the importance of rites and ceremonies
2. the study of rites and ceremonies, esp magical or religious ones
References in periodicals archive ?
The innovator is reflected in officers who engage in noble cause corruption (Klockars 1985); the ritualist in officers who, as retirement approaches, opt for the security of a desk job; the retreatist in officers with substance abuse problems or those who suffer from extreme forms of work-related stress (e.
That Stoker moves from his comment about the ritual of the production to the attendance of High Church clergy indicates his awareness of who those members were as well as the ritualist practices that were so much under public scrutiny.
Robert Ackerman, 'The Cambridge Group: Origins and Composition', The Cambridge Ritualists Reconsidered, edited by William M.
The theological change that provided room for the ritualist development was the Oxford Movement's profound revaluation, not to say devaluation, of certain aspects of the sixteenth-century reformations.
It is this ability that the Adura, the senior ritualist, utilizes as his own identity merges during the rite with that of Oddisa.
Her detailed historical contextualizing of funerary rites demonstrates how important individual artists and ritualists were in actually creating a funeral culture in Thailand in the nineteenth century.
Moreover, Rozik's theory relies on the same kinds of assertions and suffers from the same lack of interpretive data that, according to Rozik, plague the ritualists.
A second section contains Coptic spells and amulets commissioned by particular ritualists, ranging in purpose from relieving the pain of childbirth to protecting one against snakebite.
Accounts of conversions to Roman Catholicism also indicate that, true to its reputation, Oxford produced more Ritualists than Cambridge.
Here Obeyesekere's Hawaiians are rigid ritualists incapable of departing from `very specific cultural rules'.
In a preliminary discussion of the Cambridge Ritualists, Richard Schechner--one of the influential proponents of the value of anthropology for understanding theater--pointed out the pointlessness of looking for the roots of theater in order to understand theater; it is a quixotic quest, he argues, that in the end proves little.
The first was the growing schism between the evangelical leanings of Low Church Anglicans and the increasingly Catholic practices of those who followed the High Church ritualists.