Riurik


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Riurik

 

a Russian cruiser, built in St. Petersburg and commissioned in 1895. It had a displacement of 11,930 tons, a speed of 19 knots (35 km/hr), a crew of more than 800, and four 203-mm guns, 16 152-mm guns, six 120-mm guns, ten 47-mm guns, 12 37-mm guns, and six torpedo tube mounts.

In 1904 the Riurik joined the Vladivostok Cruiser Detachment. In the Russo-Japanese War of 1904–05 during combat in the Korean Strait on Aug. 1 (14), 1904, the insufficiently armored Riurik was seriously damaged at the beginning of the battle and lost control. An attempt by the squadron commander, Rear Admiral K. P. lessen, to cover the Riurik and divert the enemy failed. Surrounded by four Japanese light cruisers, the Riurik carried on a heroic battle against the enemy for two hours; 150 men were killed, including the commander and senior officer, and about 280 were wounded. In view of the threat that the ship would be captured by the enemy, Lieutenant K. Ivanov, who had taken command, ordered that the Kingston valves be opened, and the Riurik was sunk. The Japanese picked up 625 men out of the water, including 230 wounded.

References in periodicals archive ?
For the standard account of the calling of Riurik in the late ninth century from the Russian Primary Chronicle, see D.
Thus Riurik, Sineus, Truvor, Askold, Dir, Oleg, Igor, etc.
These differences include the fundamental question of the transfer of Roman power from Augustus to Prus and Riurik (see Iu.
For the compilers of the Book of Royal Degrees, the History of Kazan (Kazanskaia istoriia) and the Illuminated Chronicle Codex, the victory over the Tatars at Kazan marked the triumph of Orthodoxy and the verification of the providential role played by the descendants of Riurik since the founding of the state of Rus'.
To be sure, the dynasty that ultimately established itself in Moscow traced its genealogy to Riurik (all self-respecting European dynasties claimed Scandinavian or Roman roots), but the traces were at best questionable--and hence more stoutly insisted upon.
Perhaps he felt that a quick decision was necessary to restore political stability; perhaps he thought that, as a descendant of Riurik, he did not require the formality of an election such as that which had brought the low-born Boris Godunov to the throne in 1598.
The influence of the Tale of the Princes of Vladimir, for example, is ubiquitous: it was the source in Step 1 for the claim that the dynasty was related through Vladimir's pagan ancestor Riurik to Caesar Augustus (SK, 221-22), and in Step 4 for news that Vladimir Monomakh received an imperial crown from the Greek emperor with the Church's blessing (SK, 408-9).
As it is, the Hypatian, Radziwill, Academy, and Khlebnikov copies all report that Riurik settled in Ladoga.