Rivadavia, Bernardino

Rivadavia, Bernardino

(bārnärthē`nō rēväthä`vyä), 1780–1845, Argentine statesman and diplomat, first president of the United Provinces of La Plata (1826–27). He served (1806–7) under Jacques de LiniersLiniers, Jacques de,
Span. Santiago de Liniers y de Bremond , 1753–1810, French officer in Spanish service, viceroy of Río de la Plata. After a military and naval career in Europe, he was transferred to the Río de la Plata (1788) as a Spanish naval
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 against the British invaders and was a leading advocate of independence in 1810. As a member of the first triumvirate of the young republic (1811–12), he exerted a significant influence. After six years (1814–20) as a diplomat in Europe, he became a minister under Martín RodríguezRodríguez, Martín
, 1771–1844, Argentine general, governor of Buenos Aires prov. (1820–24). With Juan Martín de Pueyrredón, he organized a force to expel the British invaders of the Río de la Plata and later served under Jacques de
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, governor of Buenos Aires, and was largely responsible for the progressive measures of that administration. He was envoy to Great Britain before becoming president of the republic. An ardent liberal, Rivadavia instituted many reforms and strove to impose centralistic government on the nation. A unitarian constitution, adopted in 1826, was rejected by QuirogaQuiroga, Juan Facundo
, 1790–1835, Argentine caudillo. One of the most brutal of the early gaucho chieftains, he was called el tigre de los llanos (the tiger of the plains).
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 and other chieftains, who revolted. Rivadavia resigned and went into exile.

Rivadavia, Bernardino

 

Born May 20, 1780, in Buenos Aires; died Sept. 2, 1845, in Cádiz. Argentine statesman and politician; fighter for the independence of South America from Spanish rule. A leader of the Patriotic Junta—the first Argentine government set up during the war for the independence of the Spanish colonies in America.

In 1811–12, Rivadavia was a member of the Triumvirate and minister of war, then minister of domestic and foreign affairs. He was on a diplomatic mission to Europe from 1815 to 1820. As minister of domestic and foreign affairs from 1821 to 1824, Rivadavia carried out a number of political and economic reforms (limited agrarian reform and creation of a banking system), military and church reforms, and a reform of public education. From February 1826 to June 1827 he was president of the United Provinces of La Plata, which became the Federal Republic of Argentina in December 1826. Rivadavia opposed the expansion of Brazil. Under pressure from domestic reactionary forces, he resigned and emigrated.

REFERENCE

Ocherki istorii Argentiny. Moscow, 1961. Pages 125-37.
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