Tagus

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Related to River Tagus: Rio Tejo, Tajo River

Tagus

(tā`gəs), Span. Tajo, Port. Tejo, river, c.585 mi (940 km) long, rising in the mountains E of Madrid, E Spain, and draining the central part of the Iberian Peninsula. The Tagus flows northwest through the mountains, past Teruel, then north across the Meseta of central Spain, past Toledo, to form part of the Spanish-Portuguese border. Entering Portugal, it flows southwest, past Santarém and into the Atlantic Ocean at Lisbon. The estuary of the Tagus (12 mi/19 km long) is one of Europe's finest harbors; one of the longest suspension bridges in Europe, the Ponte 25 de Abril, spans the estuary. The Tagus is navigable for c.80 mi (130 km) upstream. Its lower and upper courses pass through deep gorges and are broken by waterfalls. Many dams and reservoirs have been built on the Tagus and its tributaries to generate hydroelectric power and provide water for irrigation. There have been efforts to reforest the land surrounding the river. The chief tributaries of the Tagus are the Alagón and Jarama rivers.

Tagus

 

(Spanish, Tajo; Portuguese, Tejo), a river in Spain and Portugal. The longest river on the Iberian Peninsula, the Tagus is 1,010 km long and drains an area of 81,000 sq km. It originates in the Montes Universales and crosses the New Castile plateau from east to west and, in its lower course, the Portuguese lowland. It empties into the Atlantic Ocean, forming an estuary 45 km long. In the upper and middle courses, the valley is narrow and there are numerous rapids; in the lower course, the valley is wide and the river channel has caved in in places. The river is fed primarily by rain; there is high water from November through March and low water in summer. The mean flow rate at Alcántara, near the Spanish and Portuguese border, is 438 cu m per sec.

The Tagus and its tributaries are used for irrigation and hydroelectric power. There are several reservoirs with hydroelectric power plants on the river, including Buendía, Valdecañas de Tajo, and Alcántara in Spain. The river is navigable to Santarém (Portugal) for oceangoing vessels and to Abrantes (Portugal) for other vessels, a distance of 185 km from the mouth. The cities of Toledo (Spain) and Santarém are on the Tagus, and Portugal’s capital, Lisbon, is on the estuary.

Tagus

a river in SW Europe, rising in E central Spain and flowing west to the border with Portugal, then southwest to the Atlantic at Lisbon: the longest river of the Iberian Peninsula. Length: 1007 km (626 miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
The spoken words carried down the River Tagus 'al mar de Lusitania' will not in fact perpetuate her, only those physically carved in the form of an epitaph will do that.
Thus fuelled, go down to the River Tagus, where a gigantic party goes on until breakfast time (good thing you had that coffee - plus a glass of wine or three) with live music, magic and fireworks.
Kamara serenaded a ton of VIP guests including Sir Bobby Robson on a boat trip down the River Tagus organised by Barclays Bank.
28 tram which clanks its way through the old quarters with its thousands of years of history, steep cobbled streets and amazing views over the River Tagus.
Whether walking, taking a tram through its more ancient parts, riding up or down its hills in funiculars or taking a boat ride on the River Tagus, Lisbon is impressive.
Poised precipitously on a hill overlooking a sharp bend in the River Tagus, the city of Toledo has remained miraculously unchanged since the end of the Middle Ages, when it formed the epicentre of Spanish political, cultural and religious life.
Coordination of safety and health in the implementation phase of the works of parcels service management for conservation and environmental soundness of riverbeds and banks of the River Tagus.
As we stand on our balcony and look up we are directly under one of the sights of Lisbon - the huge April 25 suspension bridge stretching across the River Tagus.
The Alentejo, derived from Alm-Tejo or Beyond the Tagus, covers almost a third of Portugal, from the south bank of the river Tagus down to the Algarve, and from the Atlantic coast to the Spanish border in the east, but it's home to just 7% of the country's population.
Built in Britain 100 years ago, the old streetcars with their wooden cabins clank and creak their way from the River Tagus to the narrow cobbled streets of mountain-top Alfama district, with its Moorish castle, the Castello Sao Jorge.
To get the true measure of the city, you have to stand on the waterfront of the River Tagus, the sea route to the Atlantic Ocean, which sent legendary explorers on journeys across the globe.
If you've had enough of royal grandeur, there's history of a different kind at nearby Belem, on the banks of the River Tagus on the outskirts of Lisbon.