Robin Hood


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Robin Hood,

legendary hero of 12th-century England who robbed the rich to help the poor. Chivalrous, manly, fair, and always ready for a joke, Robin Hood reflected many of the ideals of the English yeoman. He lived in Sherwood Forest with Little John (his chief archer), Friar Tuck, Maid Marion (his beloved), and his band. Robin Hood was the hero of at least 30 Middle English ballads and of many later stories and plays. He is mentioned in such diverse works as Piers Plowman, Ivanhoe (1820) by Sir Walter Scott, and The Once and Future King (1958) by T. H. White.

Hood, Robin

robbed rich to help poor. [Br. Lit.: Robin Hood]

Hood, Robin

outlaw; stole from rich to give to poor. [Br. Lit.: Robin Hood]

Hood, Robin

helps the poor by plundering the rich. [Br. Lit.: Robin Hood]

Hood, Robin

famed throughout land for skill as archer. [Br. Lit.: Robin Hood]

Robin Hood

(13th century) legendary outlaw of England who robbed the rich to help the poor. [Br. Hist.: EB, VIII: 615–616]

Hood, Robin

took from the rich and gave to the poor. [Br. Lit.: Robin Hood]
References in classic literature ?
And now I will tell how it came about that Robin Hood fell afoul of the law.
Never a word said Robin Hood, but he looked at the foresters with a grim face; then, turning on his heel, strode away from them down the forest glade.
Now, well would it have been for him who had first spoken had he left Robin Hood alone; but his anger was hot, both because the youth had gotten the better of him and because of the deep draughts of ale that he had been quaffing.
The great idea of the Robin Hood ballads is the victory of the poor and oppressed over the rich and powerful, the triumph of the lawless over the law-givers.
The Robin Hood ballads are full of humor; they are full, too, of English outdoor life, of hunting and fighting.
Well, say, Joe, you can be Friar Tuck or Much the miller's son, and lam me with a quarter-staff; or I'll be the Sheriff of Nottingham and you be Robin Hood a little while and kill me.
Then Tom became Robin Hood again, and was allowed by the treacherous nun to bleed his strength away through his neglected wound.
And they toasted him in nut brown ale, and hailed him as their leader, by the name of Robin Hood.
They gave Robin Hood a horn upon which he was to blow to summon them.
Among the best or most representative single ballads are: The Hunting of the Cheviot (otherwise called The Ancient Ballad of Chevy Chase--clearly of minstrel authorship); Sir Patrick Spens; Robin Hood and Guy of Gisborne; Adam Bell, Clym of the Clough, and William of Cloudeslee; Captain Car, or Edom o' Gordon; King Estmere (though this has been somewhat altered by Bishop Percy, who had and destroyed the only surviving copy of it); Edward, Edward; Young Waters; Sweet William's Ghost; Lord Thomas and Fair Annet.
For while we were talking there came on me a curious feeling that we were repeating some scene of the past, and that I was really some outlaw, found in the woods like Robin Hood, and that he had really stepped in all his plumes and purple out of the picture frame of the ancestral portrait.
A great man," replied Muscari, "worthy to rank with your own Robin Hood, signorina.