Rocket eBook

Rocket eBook

One of the first electronic books. Introduced in 1998 by NuvoMedia Inc., Palo Alto, CA, it weighed in at 22 ounces and held the equivalent of approximately 10 novels. Like a conventional book, the Rocket let you annotate in the margin, underline passages and set bookmarks. In 2000, NuvoMedia was acquired by Gemstar TV Guide International.


Rocket eBook
Specialized for continuous book reading, this eBook sported convenient scroll buttons on the side. (Image courtesy of Gemstar TV Guide International)
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The present study used the Rocket eBook, produced by NuvoMedia, Inc.
com website was conducting a competition in which two libraries would each win ten Rocket ebook readers.
The Rocket eBook is a revolutionary handheld reader that provides an easy and portable way to access e-books.
The TextCafe service also supports the automated creation of Microsoft Reader, Rocket eBook and Adobe formats.
The titles are also available in Glassbook, Rocket eBook and PDA formats, although users would have to leave the MHC site to download.
Thomson got into the digital book business through its dealings with California-based Gemstar International Group, which late last year acquired the two leading electronic-book marketers, SoftBook Press and NuvoMedia, maker of the Rocket eBook.
The downloaded copy on your Rocket eBook can be annotated and underlined, notes can be made in the margins, words and sections can be searched, and a dictionary helps with difficult or unfamiliar vocabulary.
Purchase titles off the Web and download them first to your PC, and then to the Rocket eBook.
Franklin - which sold the product under its Rolodex brand name - warned it would need to look for buyers or partners for the Rex and Rocket eBook businesses after posting a fiscal fourth quarter loss of $21.
The Rocket eBook holds the equivalent of 10 400-page books, and its backlight lets you read at night.
Once the stuff of science fiction, Rocket eBook packs in 4,000 pages of text and graphics - or about 10 average novels - into a paperback-size, 22-ounce device that sells for $499.